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post #1 of 20 (permalink) Old 01-25-2005, 09:45 PM Thread Starter
 
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Are all calories created equal?

I mean if I eat a 200 cal. hamburger, does that have the same caloric effect as drinking a 200 cal. lemonade?
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post #2 of 20 (permalink) Old 01-25-2005, 10:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian
I mean if I eat a 200 cal. hamburger, does that have the same caloric effect as drinking a 200 cal. lemonade?

Since calories are a measure of energy, there cannot be, different "types" of calories. A fat calorie has the same amount of energy as a protein calorie. And wow a 200 Cal lemonade ? Stay away from that stuff

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post #3 of 20 (permalink) Old 01-25-2005, 10:51 PM
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They are "equal".

But, how those calories effect your biochemistry is another story...Insulin and Glycemic regulation for example.

-- Matthew --

"I'm just a simple man trying to make his way in the Universe" - Jango Fett
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post #4 of 20 (permalink) Old 01-25-2005, 11:58 PM
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Should be equal... but I'd still be hungry after a lemonade

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post #5 of 20 (permalink) Old 01-26-2005, 05:32 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BuzByU
Since calories are a measure of energy, there cannot be, different "types" of calories. A fat calorie has the same amount of energy as a protein calorie. And wow a 200 Cal lemonade ? Stay away from that stuff
Gregg,

Hmmm....just a little confused here (gee is that anything new ) On my thread mill, the read out, gives all kinds of feedback, one is "calories burned" then "fat" calories, it takes 310 "calories burned" to burn 100 "fat" calories. So does that mean it's harder to burn a fat calorie? I always thought a calorie was the energy it takes to raise the tempature of water (one CC) one centigrade?

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post #6 of 20 (permalink) Old 01-26-2005, 05:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian
I mean if I eat a 200 cal. hamburger, does that have the same caloric effect as drinking a 200 cal. lemonade?

Hell, were are you finding a 200 cal hamburger? A big mac is 560!

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post #7 of 20 (permalink) Old 01-26-2005, 05:40 AM Thread Starter
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RickC1957
Hell, were are you finding a 200 cal hamburger? A big mac is 560!
Heck ... Hardees biggest seller in Dec. was the "2/3 LB Monster Thickburger" . It weighs in at a little over 1400 calories, and add in the fries/drink, you are looking at exceeding ones daily recommended caloric intake at over 2000 calories.
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post #8 of 20 (permalink) Old 01-26-2005, 05:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian
Heck ... Hardees biggest seller in Dec. was the "2/3 LB Monster Thickburger" . It weighs in at a little over 1400 calories, and add in the fries/drink, you are looking at exceeding ones daily recommended caloric intake at over 2000 calories.


HOLY F___!!!!!!!! I don't eat 2000 cals in a freaking day.

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post #9 of 20 (permalink) Old 01-26-2005, 06:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RickC1957
Gregg,

Hmmm....just a little confused here (gee is that anything new ) On my thread mill, the read out, gives all kinds of feedback, one is "calories burned" then "fat" calories, it takes 310 "calories burned" to burn 100 "fat" calories. So does that mean it's harder to burn a fat calorie? I always thought a calorie was the energy it takes to raise the tempature of water (one CC) one centigrade?

Rick
Exactly Rick is it an amount of energy... throw that crappy thread mill out and have a beer!

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Gregg
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post #10 of 20 (permalink) Old 01-26-2005, 10:27 AM
 
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Are all calories the same? No, and here's why

Common sense would suggest that a calorie is a calorie is a calorie, right? Unfortunately, there is no law that human nutrition must follow common sense. The truth is that the body treats different kinds of calories differently and that fat calories tend to be "fatter" than those from proteins and carbohydrates. There are 4 nutrients that provide energy: Fat, Carbohydrate, Protein and Alcohol. As a rule of thumb, fat provides 9 calories per gram, carbohydrates and protein provide 4 calories per gram and alcohol delivers 7 calories per gram.

In actual practice, however, these numbers are somewhat misleading because your body is more efficient at storing energy from fat than it is in storing energy from protein. For example, 97 percent of the calories provided by fat are actually available to the body. In contrast, your body can only use about 75 percent of the calories that protein provides. The metabolic reasons for the differences in efficiency between different fuels is not well understood, but may have something to do with differences in the amount of energy needed for digestion, absorption and delivery of each type of fuel. At 97 percent efficiency, about 3 percent of the energy from fat is "lost",usually as heat. This means that for every 100 calories of fat consumed, 3 calories are lost as heat and 97 calories are available for energy or storage.
Fuel Efficiency of Energetic Nutrients (per 100 calories):

Fat 97
Alcohol 85
Carbohydrate 82
Protein 75

In addition to the differences in fuel efficiency between the energetic nutrients, there is also a certain amount of variation in fuel selection between different people. Some people have a tendency to burn more fat, while others prefer to burn more carbohydrates.

Carbohydrate storage is carefully regulated in the body, while fat storage is not. The body has an almost unlimited capacity to store calories as fat (unfortunately), but, only about 4,000 calories (at most) can be stored as carbohydrate in the form of liver and muscle glycogen.

Experiments have shown that the body will burn carbohydrate calories first, turning only to fat calories when additional energy is needed. An excess intake of carbohydrates, while not directly promoting an increase in fat storage, will provide a ready source of calories for energy-requiring processes, preventing the body from accessing stored fat energy.

It is not well understood why some people are better fat burners or why others are better at storing fat. It may have to do with concentrations of fat-burning enzymes, number of blood vessels in adipose tissue, or the presence or absence of various genetic variables. What is clear, however, is that those individuals identified as "high fat burners" tend to burn more of the fat that they consume in their diets and therefore have less to store.

Conversely, "high carbohydrate burners" tend to store more of the fat that they eat and are more than twice as likely to become overweight as the high fat burners.

You can enhance your body's ability to burn fat through endurance exercises like running, walking, cycling and hiking. Over time, your body develops enhanced blood supplies to tissues, produces higher levels of enzymes involved in fat metabolism and "learns" to use fat more often as an energy source.

What are Calories

A calorie is a measurement of energy. We tend to associate calories with food, but any sort of energy can be measured in calories. The official definition of a calorie is the amount of energy needed to raise the temperature of a gram of water by 1 degree C. A kilocalorie is 1,000 calories. Just to make life confusing, the "calorie" that you see on packages of food is really a "kilocalorie" in the scientific sense.

Specifically, a calorie is the amount of energy, or heat, it takes to raise the temperature of 1 gram of water 1 degree Celsius (1.8 degrees Fahrenheit). One calorie is equal to 4.184 joules, a common unit of energy used in the physical sciences.

I have many books on the subject, just ask

Last edited by VIVID1; 01-26-2005 at 10:33 AM.
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post #11 of 20 (permalink) Old 01-26-2005, 10:29 AM
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post #12 of 20 (permalink) Old 01-26-2005, 03:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VIVID1
Are all calories the same? No, and here's why

Common sense would suggest that a calorie is a calorie is a calorie, right? Unfortunately, there is no law that human nutrition must follow common sense. The truth is that the body treats different kinds of calories differently and that fat calories tend to be "fatter" than those from proteins and carbohydrates. There are 4 nutrients that provide energy: Fat, Carbohydrate, Protein and Alcohol. As a rule of thumb, fat provides 9 calories per gram, carbohydrates and protein provide 4 calories per gram and alcohol delivers 7 calories per gram.

In actual practice, however, these numbers are somewhat misleading because your body is more efficient at storing energy from fat than it is in storing energy from protein. For example, 97 percent of the calories provided by fat are actually available to the body. In contrast, your body can only use about 75 percent of the calories that protein provides. The metabolic reasons for the differences in efficiency between different fuels is not well understood, but may have something to do with differences in the amount of energy needed for digestion, absorption and delivery of each type of fuel. At 97 percent efficiency, about 3 percent of the energy from fat is "lost",usually as heat. This means that for every 100 calories of fat consumed, 3 calories are lost as heat and 97 calories are available for energy or storage.
Fuel Efficiency of Energetic Nutrients (per 100 calories):

Fat 97
Alcohol 85
Carbohydrate 82
Protein 75

In addition to the differences in fuel efficiency between the energetic nutrients, there is also a certain amount of variation in fuel selection between different people. Some people have a tendency to burn more fat, while others prefer to burn more carbohydrates.

Carbohydrate storage is carefully regulated in the body, while fat storage is not. The body has an almost unlimited capacity to store calories as fat (unfortunately), but, only about 4,000 calories (at most) can be stored as carbohydrate in the form of liver and muscle glycogen.

Experiments have shown that the body will burn carbohydrate calories first, turning only to fat calories when additional energy is needed. An excess intake of carbohydrates, while not directly promoting an increase in fat storage, will provide a ready source of calories for energy-requiring processes, preventing the body from accessing stored fat energy.

It is not well understood why some people are better fat burners or why others are better at storing fat. It may have to do with concentrations of fat-burning enzymes, number of blood vessels in adipose tissue, or the presence or absence of various genetic variables. What is clear, however, is that those individuals identified as "high fat burners" tend to burn more of the fat that they consume in their diets and therefore have less to store.

Conversely, "high carbohydrate burners" tend to store more of the fat that they eat and are more than twice as likely to become overweight as the high fat burners.

You can enhance your body's ability to burn fat through endurance exercises like running, walking, cycling and hiking. Over time, your body develops enhanced blood supplies to tissues, produces higher levels of enzymes involved in fat metabolism and "learns" to use fat more often as an energy source.

What are Calories

A calorie is a measurement of energy. We tend to associate calories with food, but any sort of energy can be measured in calories. The official definition of a calorie is the amount of energy needed to raise the temperature of a gram of water by 1 degree C. A kilocalorie is 1,000 calories. Just to make life confusing, the "calorie" that you see on packages of food is really a "kilocalorie" in the scientific sense.

Specifically, a calorie is the amount of energy, or heat, it takes to raise the temperature of 1 gram of water 1 degree Celsius (1.8 degrees Fahrenheit). One calorie is equal to 4.184 joules, a common unit of energy used in the physical sciences.

I have many books on the subject, just ask

I think I just burned some fat calories trying to digest all that information

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post #13 of 20 (permalink) Old 01-26-2005, 04:03 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RickC1957
On my thread mill, the read out, gives all kinds of feedback, one is "calories burned" then "fat" calories, it takes 310 "calories burned" to burn 100 "fat" calories. So does that mean it's harder to burn a fat calorie?
But now you know what the answer is to the above question. The reason your treadmill displays fat calories, is that those are the hardest and most stubborn calories to burn. Those are the ones you are trying to loose when you exercise, the others you can burn just breathing, digesting and drinking cold water
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post #14 of 20 (permalink) Old 02-18-2005, 07:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VIVID1
But now you know what the answer is to the above question. The reason your treadmill displays fat calories, is that those are the hardest and most stubborn calories to burn. Those are the ones you are trying to loose when you exercise, the others you can burn just breathing, digesting and drinking cold water
Yep, the body has to convert stored fat before the caloric energy can be used by the body. It is a "fuel" reserve and gets tapped as a reserve.

I'm not sure how your treadmill knows about fat calories, unless there is a particular fixed ratio above a certain exercise level. It's likely just a ratio to help motivate you.

Dave
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post #15 of 20 (permalink) Old 02-18-2005, 08:11 AM
 
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The measurement tool used to determine the energy avaiable in food is determined by burnging it in a special device that measures teh net energy released.

However, your body does not always process foods in the same manner. It's typcially accurate for fats and sugars, but calories from protein are different. You body is very inefficient at converting proteins to sugars. A significant amount of the energy is lost in the multiple chemical conversions needed to change an amino acid to a glucose molecule.

This is one reason why you can rapidly lose weight on an Atkins diet. You fill yourself up with protein and fat, which has a nice slow energy release, but is converted ineffeciently. SO you might consume 3000 calories of meat and fat, but your body only metabolises perhaps 2500 of those.
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post #16 of 20 (permalink) Old 02-18-2005, 08:17 AM
 
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Originally Posted by BusaDave
Yep, the body has to convert stored fat before the caloric energy can be used by the body. It is a "fuel" reserve and gets tapped as a reserve.

I'm not sure how your treadmill knows about fat calories, unless there is a particular fixed ratio above a certain exercise level. It's likely just a ratio to help motivate you.

It's jsut using a simple conversion table depending on your weight to calculate roughtly how many calories you burn at a given speed or incline.


Bottom line - there are soooooo many factors that affect basal metabolic rate, and the rate at which yo burn calories, it's difficult ot accurately predict anything.

Jsut excersise and eat smaller portions and cut out sugar soda and alcohol. I've lost 11 lbs in the last 7 weeks using that simple method. I plan ot lose anothe 20 lbs ot get to my target. I figure it will take about 4-6 months. That's not bad considering it took 4 years to put that weight on.
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post #17 of 20 (permalink) Old 02-18-2005, 09:22 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BusaDave
I'm not sure how your treadmill knows about fat calories, unless there is a particular fixed ratio above a certain exercise level. It's likely just a ratio to help motivate you.
The body takes approximately 20 minutes of continuous aerobic exercise before it stars using reserve fat storage as energy. There is a range of aerobic exercise that you need to sustain to burn fat. The treadmill calculates your speed but does not know how long you will be walking, unless you use a program set for a specific amount of time. So my guess the calculations it does would be an approximation at best of calories/fat burned for motivational purposes or to track your progress.
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post #18 of 20 (permalink) Old 02-18-2005, 11:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BusaDave
Yep, the body has to convert stored fat before the caloric energy can be used by the body. It is a "fuel" reserve and gets tapped as a reserve.

I'm not sure how your treadmill knows about fat calories, unless there is a particular fixed ratio above a certain exercise level. It's likely just a ratio to help motivate you.

Dave,

I'm almost positive it a fixed ratio, 3 to 1 or there abouts. These read outs usually depress me A very fast paced walk and in 30 minutes I only burn 318 calories, and I soaked in sweat, a measely 318 calories

Rick

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post #19 of 20 (permalink) Old 02-18-2005, 12:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RickC1957
Dave,

I'm almost positive it a fixed ratio, 3 to 1 or there abouts. These read outs usually depress me A very fast paced walk and in 30 minutes I only burn 318 calories, and I soaked in sweat, a measely 318 calories

Rick

I hear ya! But calories are not the only benefit, thankfully. At least as your conditioning gets better, you can crank up the intensity a bit and burn more calories.

Dave
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post #20 of 20 (permalink) Old 02-18-2005, 12:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BusaDave
I hear ya! But calories are not the only benefit, thankfully. At least as your conditioning gets better, you can crank up the intensity a bit and burn more calories.
Not to mention that your metalbolism is sped up over time, so even when you're not working out, your body's using more calories than it did in the past.

On average, your body uses 70-80% of your spent energy each day on normal functions (breathing, circulating blood, thinking, moving around, etc.)
If you eat a proper amount of calories and exercise just enough to burn of that remaining 20-30%, then you're set.

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