Employee handbook in IL ... HR question - Chicagoland Sportbikes
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post #1 of 12 (permalink) Old 09-14-2004, 11:30 AM Thread Starter
 
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Employee handbook in IL ... HR question

Does anyone know or can tell me where I can find this info.

Does a company in Illinois require to provide all employees with an employee handbook. My company doesnít have one, we also donít have job descriptions for our employees either. We are a ISO 9001 company with over 2000 employees.

For example, the guy I hired to develop the company website has piercings and was told many times not to wear them at work. Since Iím his manager, the VP of HR told me to watch him and to tell HR if it happens again. I didnít even know what to say to this since there is no employee handbook, so I have no idea what the rules are for dress code. HR makes rules us as they see fit, but they are not in print anywhere.
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post #2 of 12 (permalink) Old 09-14-2004, 11:34 AM
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your iso 9001 and have no company employee hand book?? no job description ???? WOW!!! do they ever get iso audited????

they should have one and definetly have job descriptions to be iso

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post #3 of 12 (permalink) Old 09-14-2004, 11:36 AM
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Just fowarded this to my better half

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post #4 of 12 (permalink) Old 09-14-2004, 11:42 AM
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that sucks. i would definetely think there has to be a employee handbook, i have never been at a company where there wasn't one. weird.

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post #5 of 12 (permalink) Old 09-14-2004, 11:42 AM Thread Starter
 
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Quote:
Originally posted by JimGoFast
your iso 9001 and have no company employee hand book?? no job description ???? WOW!!! do they ever get iso audited????

they should have one and definetly have job descriptions to be iso
That is what I though too

Let me add, that I think there is some discrimination going on too. HR said that men at this company are not allowed to wear earrings, but there is ONE older guy that has a little earring, a little gold stud. My web guy has his brow pierced, above his lip, and one ear. He was told by HR not to wear any of his jewelry to work.

Last edited by VIVID1; 09-14-2004 at 11:53 AM.
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post #6 of 12 (permalink) Old 09-14-2004, 11:43 AM
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http://public.findlaw.com/employment...35C3CFD28.html

Employee Handbooks
An employee handbook can be a valuable tool in communicating your policies to your workforce. But don't make any promises you don't intend to keep.

If you have more than a few employees, consider creating an employee handbook that clearly explains your employment policies. The benefits of having an employee handbook are many. Every employee receives the same information about the rules of the workplace, your employees will know what is expected of them and what they can expect from you and you will have some measure of legal protection if an employee later challenges you in court.

What Goes in an Employee Handbook
Here are topics to consider including in an employee handbook.
Introduction. Begin the handbook by describing your company's history and business philosophy.

Hours. State the normal working hours for full-time employees, rules for part-time employees and how overtime can be authorized for those entitled to it.

Pay and salaries. Be clear on how you set pay and salaries and how you raise them. Also explain any bonus programs.

Benefits. Explain the rules relating to benefits, including vacation pay, sick pay, unpaid leave, health benefits, other insurance benefits and retirement benefits.

Drug and alcohol abuse. Most businesses have a policy prohibiting employees from using drugs or alcohol in the workplace. Some also offer to help employees deal with substance abuse through counseling or employee assistance programs.

Sexual harassment. Remind employees that sexual harassment is illegal and violates your policies. Let them know that you will not tolerate unwelcome sexual comments or conduct, and that you will treat any complaints of harassment seriously. Specify how and to whom an employee can complain of sexual harassment, what procedures you will follow to investigate complaints, and what actions will be taken against harassers.

Attendance. Emphasize the importance of good attendance and showing up on time. Explain that numerous unexplained absences or repeated tardiness can be a basis for disciplinary action or even firing.

Discipline. List the kinds of conduct that can get employees in trouble -- for example, theft, violence, repeated performance problems or fighting. Be sure to let your employees know that this is not an exclusive list and that you always reserve the right to decide to terminate a worker's employment.

Employee safety. State that employee safety is a major concern of your business and that employees are expected to follow safety rules and report any potentially dangerous conditions.

Smoking. Most businesses need a written policy for on-the-job smoking. Because many cities and some states now prohibit or restrict workplace smoking, you will have to check local ordinances to be sure your policy is legal.

Complaints. Let employees know what procedures to follow to make and resolve complaints. Designate several people in the company to receive employee complaints, and state that there will be no retaliation against any employee for filing a complaint. Having -- and enforcing -- a written complaint procedure can help shield your business from liability if an employee later sues for illegal harassment or discrimination.

Workplace civility. State that employees at all levels of the company are expected to treat each other with respect and that the success of the business depends on cooperation and teamwork among all employees.

Don't Create Obligations That Will Haunt You Later
Some courts -- and employees -- interpret the language in employee handbooks to create binding obligations on employers. You should avoid any unconditional promises in your employee handbook unless you are willing to face lawsuits by former employees trying to enforce those promises later. Here are some of the most common trouble spots:
Promises of continued employment. Unless you want to create an employment contract that obligates your employee to work for you for a period of time (and limits your right to fire the employee for the same period), don't put language in your handbook that promises employees a job as long as they follow your rules. A court might interpret this as a contract of employment, promising that employees will not be fired absent good cause. To avoid this result, state in the handbook that your company reserves the right to terminate employees for reasons not stated in the handbook or for no reason at all. Even though you may never have to rely on this language, at least your employees will know where they stand.

To learn about employment contracts, including how they can be created through employee handbooks or other statements by the employer, and the additional rights they confer on employees, see Firing Employees with Employment Contracts.

Conduct not covered by the handbook. Of course, you cannot write an employee handbook that will cover every possible workplace situation. It's best to make this clear to your employees, up front, by saying so in the handbook. Otherwise, your employees may argue that any action you take outside of what's explicitly set forth in the handbook is unfair.

Progressive discipline. Most employers follow some form of "progressive discipline" for performance problems or less serious forms of misconduct (attendance problems, difficulties getting along with co-workers or missing deadlines, for example). You may choose to start with a verbal warning, followed by a written warning for a second offense, followed by a probationary period or suspension, then termination for subsequent problems. Whatever system you implement, make sure to keep your options open. Don't obligate yourself to follow a particular disciplinary pattern for every employee in every circumstance; otherwise, you may find it difficult to fire an employee for truly egregious behavior.

To learn more about good disciplinary practices, see Disciplinary Policies.


Copyright 2002 Nolo, Inc.

Last edited by QuickStudy; 09-14-2004 at 11:46 AM.
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post #7 of 12 (permalink) Old 09-14-2004, 11:44 AM
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We get iso audited at a min once a year, and are quized about all policies!!
strange, very strange

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post #8 of 12 (permalink) Old 09-14-2004, 12:09 PM
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Just checked with the ISO smurf inmy company. Employee Handbook and Job descriptions are not required according to ISO. In regards to the HR questions, I am waiting on the reply from my wife, she is a Corporate HR manager at 6000 + employees S&P 500 company. She writes those things constantly

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post #9 of 12 (permalink) Old 09-14-2004, 12:21 PM
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Answers to your questions:

1. No, no employer is required to have an employee handbook.
2. Employers are not obligated to have job descriptions but should have them for certain positions that are affected by Sarbanes Oxley.
3. As for the piercings, that should be addressed by company policy. Even though a company may not have an employee handbook, it still has policies... and they don't have to be written. The company can have known practices/procedures that aren't written down and the courts often uphold these. The only problem with that is that you have to treat all the employees the same. You can't have rules that affect one group of employees and not the other, unless those employees work in an environment which dictate those special rules. For example, if the employee has tattoos or body piercings and his/her job requires that they be in physical contact with outside vendors, the company can require that the employee remove the piercings and cover the tattoos when on the job. This is not uncommon in a conservative or business environment.
4. If the VP of HR advised this, then there probably is a policy somewhere.

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post #10 of 12 (permalink) Old 09-14-2004, 01:02 PM Thread Starter
 
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Quote:
Originally posted by RSVMillenian
4. If the VP of HR advised this, then there probably is a policy somewhere.
In his head

Iím pretty sure he makes these rules on the fly. Over the last few months one of the engineers started to grow out his hair, he was told to keep it manageable and that the company doesnít allow men to have pony tails.


Thanks, for the info.
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post #11 of 12 (permalink) Old 09-14-2004, 01:21 PM
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Not sure where you can get a IL HR book. I do know that IL is a 'at will employment' which pretty much means that you can get fired/let go without a reason.

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post #12 of 12 (permalink) Old 09-14-2004, 01:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by VIVID1
In his head

Iím pretty sure he makes these rules on the fly. Over the last few months one of the engineers started to grow out his hair, he was told to keep it manageable and that the company doesnít allow men to have pony tails.


Thanks, for the info.
Ask him to publish them? It's easier to give the employees a policy in writing than try to explain to them why, after X weeks working, their dress is not appropriate.

And no job description is . How do you rate him for performance and salary? How does he know he's doing his job?

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