Anyone know about MIG welders? - Chicagoland Sportbikes
Chicagoland Sportbikes
 
Open Forum This forum is for all off-topic discussion.

 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-21-2005, 02:19 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
ClevisR6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: West
Posts: 1,009
Location: West
Sportbike: 04 Zuma, 06 Crf50
Years Riding: sho' nuff!
How you found us: Nesba
           
Anyone know about MIG welders?

I was thinking of getting one and welding my subrame instead of buying a new/used one.
I would need one that runs on 115/120v
can someone throw down some basics of a mig welder and good brands models? nothing fancy though.
ClevisR6 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-21-2005, 02:46 PM
Registered User
 
MM Racing's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Hoffman Est., IL
Posts: 4,527
Location: Hoffman Est., IL
Sportbike: Squat
Years Riding: More then one hands worth.
How you found us: Your Mother
           
Send a message via AIM to MM Racing
I am assuming that your subframe is aluminum, If so then a MIG is not the way to go. You will never get the strength back not to mention to setup a MIG properly for aluminum you will be close to spending what you would on a used TIG. Do you know the difference in welding methods? That should be the first basic, from there it is all about amerage, feed adjustablility, wave form and frequency adjustability.

Miller, or Lincoln. I am a big fan of Lincoln, but they all have similiar features at similiar price points. If you are really set on doing this then I would not even considering MIGing aluminum without a spool gun.

Ian
MM Racing is offline  
post #3 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-21-2005, 02:49 PM
Your friendly Crazy Canuk
 
RickC1957's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Barrington, Illinois
Posts: 12,731
Location: Barrington, Illinois
Sportbike: Ducati ST3 2005 Gloss Black, Monster 620, 2007 Sport Classic 1000
Years Riding: Crashing sucessfully since 1969
How you found us: Thru favorednation (ron)
           
Send a message via AIM to RickC1957 Send a message via Yahoo to RickC1957
I have a Clarke Welder, that's gas/nogas operates on standard current, I have done stuff up to 1/4" thick (you have to know how to weld to accomplish that )I have a friend who has a Miller(s), when he saw my unit he thought I had bought a Miller, just the same colour blue. Mine is made in Italy and is a nice little unit. I've done some nice stuff with it, my best work so far......controls for Bernie's Dad airplane. I even impressed myself with that one.

Sometimes goodbye is your second chance.
RickC1957 is offline  
post #4 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-21-2005, 02:52 PM
Your friendly Crazy Canuk
 
RickC1957's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Barrington, Illinois
Posts: 12,731
Location: Barrington, Illinois
Sportbike: Ducati ST3 2005 Gloss Black, Monster 620, 2007 Sport Classic 1000
Years Riding: Crashing sucessfully since 1969
How you found us: Thru favorednation (ron)
           
Send a message via AIM to RickC1957 Send a message via Yahoo to RickC1957
Quote:
Originally Posted by MM Racing
I am assuming that your subframe is aluminum, If so then a MIG is not the way to go. You will never get the strength back not to mention to setup a MIG properly for aluminum you will be close to spending what you would on a used TIG. Do you know the difference in welding methods? That should be the first basic, from there it is all about amerage, feed adjustablility, wave form and frequency adjustability.

Miller, or Lincoln. I am a big fan of Lincoln, but they all have similiar features at similiar price points. If you are really set on doing this then I would not even considering MIGing aluminum without a spool gun.

+1 on TIG for Aluminum, but it can be done by MIG with the right shielding gas and pre-heating the aluminum.

Sometimes goodbye is your second chance.
RickC1957 is offline  
post #5 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-21-2005, 02:54 PM
Registered User
 
BanditCPA's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: .
Posts: 2,083
Location: .
Sportbike: Moto Guzzi V-11 sport
Years Riding: since 1998
How you found us: .
           
Quote:
Originally Posted by RickC1957
I have a Clarke Welder, that's gas/nogas operates on standard current, I have done stuff up to 1/4" thick (you have to know how to weld to accomplish that )I have a friend who has a Miller(s), when he saw my unit he thought I had bought a Miller, just the same colour blue. Mine is made in Italy and is a nice little unit. I've done some nice stuff with it, my best work so far......controls for Bernie's Dad airplane. I even impressed myself with that one.
I can attest for Rick's work....very high quality!!

Look, I can appreciate this. I was young too, I felt just like you. Hated authority, hated all my bosses, thought they were full of shit. Look, it's like they say, if you're not a rebel by the age of 20, you got no heart, but if you haven't turned establishment by 30, you've got no brains. Because there are no story-book romances, no fairy-tale endings. So before you run out and change the world, ask yourself, "What do you really want?"
BanditCPA is offline  
post #6 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-21-2005, 04:04 PM
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 757
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClevisR6
I was thinking of getting one and welding my subrame instead of buying a new/used one.
I would need one that runs on 115/120v
can someone throw down some basics of a mig welder and good brands models? nothing fancy though.

Your going to spend alot more money to buy a GMAW machine than you will just buying a new subframe. Besides do you know how to weld? MIG sounds all nice and simple, but you have to choose the right wire and shielding gas for what you are welding on.

And like everyone else said, you dont really want to MIG aluminum. There is no surface tension, so if you get it too hot, it will just melt away from underneat you. GTAW would definatly be the way to go, or if you are really really good you could weld it with an oxy-acetylene torch.
Texas Blonde is offline  
post #7 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-21-2005, 05:05 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
ClevisR6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: West
Posts: 1,009
Location: West
Sportbike: 04 Zuma, 06 Crf50
Years Riding: sho' nuff!
How you found us: Nesba
           
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas Blonde
Your going to spend alot more money to buy a GMAW machine than you will just buying a new subframe. Besides do you know how to weld? MIG sounds all nice and simple, but you have to choose the right wire and shielding gas for what you are welding on.

And like everyone else said, you dont really want to MIG aluminum. There is no surface tension, so if you get it too hot, it will just melt away from underneat you. GTAW would definatly be the way to go, or if you are really really good you could weld it with an oxy-acetylene torch.

i've only arc welded before...

i realize it will be a little more expensive than a subframe, but i'd like to learn how to do it, and if i snap the subframe again, i can just fix it.

so just get a tig welder? i have heard of miller before. 1 of my friends lowsided at road america and snapped his rearset on the tl, this guy just welded it up on the spot for free. and gave him some miller stickers.. weekend saved!!

just trying to get an idea. i don't know, i love doing shit myself and wouldn't mind having a welder lying around.
ClevisR6 is offline  
post #8 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-21-2005, 05:28 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
ClevisR6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: West
Posts: 1,009
Location: West
Sportbike: 04 Zuma, 06 Crf50
Years Riding: sho' nuff!
How you found us: Nesba
           
any one have an idea on price for a "hobby" tig welder?
or know any one who is selling one?
ClevisR6 is offline  
post #9 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-21-2005, 07:11 PM
Registered User
 
MM Racing's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Hoffman Est., IL
Posts: 4,527
Location: Hoffman Est., IL
Sportbike: Squat
Years Riding: More then one hands worth.
How you found us: Your Mother
           
Send a message via AIM to MM Racing
I paid $1400 for my Lincoln 175, this is brand new though. You can find them on ebay used for prolly around a grand. You do not need much more then 150A for what you are doing, but you do have to make sure it is AC. Also you might want to practice ALOT on scrap aluminum especially pieces of cast stuff. I would say next to Ti that Al is the hardest thing to weld.

Oh yeah and unless you get an expensive ($2500) inverter style machine you will more then likely have to have a 220VAC / 50A circuit for it.

Ian
MM Racing is offline  
post #10 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-21-2005, 10:17 PM
Your friendly Crazy Canuk
 
RickC1957's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Barrington, Illinois
Posts: 12,731
Location: Barrington, Illinois
Sportbike: Ducati ST3 2005 Gloss Black, Monster 620, 2007 Sport Classic 1000
Years Riding: Crashing sucessfully since 1969
How you found us: Thru favorednation (ron)
           
Send a message via AIM to RickC1957 Send a message via Yahoo to RickC1957
Quote:
Originally Posted by MM Racing
I paid $1400 for my Lincoln 175, this is brand new though. You can find them on ebay used for prolly around a grand. You do not need much more then 150A for what you are doing, but you do have to make sure it is AC. Also you might want to practice ALOT on scrap aluminum especially pieces of cast stuff. I would say next to Ti that Al is the hardest thing to weld.

Oh yeah and unless you get an expensive ($2500) inverter style machine you will more then likely have to have a 220VAC / 50A circuit for it.
Welding cast aluminum is a totally different ball game, I'll admit that and beyond my skill set. The stuff I did was 1/8" sheet stock and really wasn't that difficult to do. I'll post up the repair I did to my stator cover, that didn't turn out too badly.

Sometimes goodbye is your second chance.
RickC1957 is offline  
post #11 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-21-2005, 11:28 PM
" It Time To Ride "
 
Justmax's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Fairview hgts
Posts: 1,595
Location: Fairview hgts
Sportbike: Suzuki GSX-R750
Years Riding: 20+
How you found us: Long search for motorcycle clubs online
           
Send a message via MSN to Justmax
Talking

Quote:
Originally Posted by RickC1957
+1 on TIG for Aluminum, but it can be done by MIG with the right shielding gas and pre-heating the aluminum.
Oh Rick I need tab weld on my seat buddy ole pal!!!

US MARINE CORP
"Semper Fi''

Justmax is offline  
post #12 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-22-2005, 01:31 AM
Registered User
 
toys4pops's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Round Lake
Posts: 773
Location: Round Lake
Sportbike: '07 Factory RSVR
Years Riding: not long enough
How you found us: member
           
Lincoln weld pak 3200 HD???

I have a brand new Lincoln weld pak 3200 HD sitting in the garage, bought it at Home Depot. Anyone have any experience with these? I haven't read the instructions yet, but it's wire fed and needs some gas. Once I clean up the garage, I'm gonna play with it. Maybe I can enlist one of YOU Welders to give me some welding tips, sometime this summer?(before or after a ride)?
I'd like to weld/make some aluminum brackets/mounts for my GPS.
toys4pops is offline  
post #13 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-22-2005, 07:17 AM
Your friendly Crazy Canuk
 
RickC1957's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Barrington, Illinois
Posts: 12,731
Location: Barrington, Illinois
Sportbike: Ducati ST3 2005 Gloss Black, Monster 620, 2007 Sport Classic 1000
Years Riding: Crashing sucessfully since 1969
How you found us: Thru favorednation (ron)
           
Send a message via AIM to RickC1957 Send a message via Yahoo to RickC1957
Quote:
Originally Posted by toys4pops
I have a brand new Lincoln weld pak 3200 HD sitting in the garage, bought it at Home Depot. Anyone have any experience with these? I haven't read the instructions yet, but it's wire fed and needs some gas. Once I clean up the garage, I'm gonna play with it. Maybe I can enlist one of YOU Welders to give me some welding tips, sometime this summer?(before or after a ride)?
I'd like to weld/make some aluminum brackets/mounts for my GPS.
best tip....pick up this book

Welder's Handbook A complete guide yo MIG, TIG, ARC & OXYACETYLENE Welding

by Richard Finch.

I'm a self taught welder. I went to the Metal Supermarket in Elk Grove, asked for scraps, they gave me a ton of it, and practice, practice, practice.

Make sure everything is clean, and I mean clean. Any dirt or contamination will make your welds look like shit. If you weld aluminum, make sure it's super clean and pre heat it, you'll need argon gas. Unfortunately Argon doesn't conduct heat like CO2 does. I get my gas and bottles from Terrace Gas Supply in Schaumburg.

Sometimes goodbye is your second chance.
RickC1957 is offline  
post #14 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-22-2005, 07:55 AM
Registered User
 
MM Racing's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Hoffman Est., IL
Posts: 4,527
Location: Hoffman Est., IL
Sportbike: Squat
Years Riding: More then one hands worth.
How you found us: Your Mother
           
Send a message via AIM to MM Racing
I am also self taught on MIG when I was 16 welding up exahust systems in the garage. Also self taught with TIG doing parts for Moparboyys car and just general practicing on scraps like Rick did. Yes cast aluminum is a totally different ball park and very much more diffucult to weld because you can not tell whats under the surface as far as porousity goes or the purity of the cast material.

+1 on that book. If you know someone who welds, watch them for an hour or two and then you will have a general idea, but most of it is just finess. I equate good welding to good painting, it is an art and requires that sort of time investment to get it right.

Ian
MM Racing is offline  
post #15 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-22-2005, 08:14 AM
Resident Slow guy
 
Ohfugit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Chicago
Posts: 6,771
Location: Chicago
Sportbike: 250x_Dirtbike Triumph_Tripled_955i 90_H-D_Bagger CR80_Mini_Motard
Years Riding: Street_LOOOOOOONG_Time Track Backmarker
How you found us: Google
           
Send a message via AIM to Ohfugit
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClevisR6
I was thinking of getting one and welding my subrame instead of buying a new/used one.
I would need one that runs on 115/120v
can someone throw down some basics of a mig welder and good brands models? nothing fancy though.
I've got a Hobart Handler model 135... it may be model 125( I forgot) its 115v
It says it will do aluminium and I've tried but you really need a feeder gun,

I haven't taken it any further so I can't comment on how well it will work in this config

Ohfugit is offline  
post #16 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-22-2005, 11:01 AM
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 557
  
I own a miller econotig which outputs in both ac/dc. It puts out just enough power to keep me happy but I'd like to move up to a syncrowave 250 when my housing situation permits. It cost $900 from a friend and that didn't include gas, consumables, torch, etc...
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClevisR6
i realize it will be a little more expensive than a subframe, but i'd like to learn how to do it, and if i snap the subframe again, i can just fix it.
Try 10x more expensive than your subframe on ebay minimum. Tig welding is generally regarded to be the hardest form of welding out there. Even if you manage to goop some filler on there, as a beginner, you have no idea what constitutes a "bad" weld or a "good" weld. I've done everything from tube frames to gas tanks to pressure vessels and when a life is on the line you have to know what you're doing. After almost 10 years with tig there are so many things that I have yet to learn.
IMO, you have to learn to walk before you run. If you're serious, get a millermatic 130 or similar - make sure it has an option to run shielding gas because you don't want to spend half your time chipping flux core slag away. Also, go to some classes at your local community college (for a few hundred you get instruction and all the scrap that you can use to practice with). AVOID MORAINE VALLEY if your are in the area as their program is pitiful. Don't even give those shitty Wal-mart welders a second glance. Be prepared to spend at least 4-500 to start and probably more. Also, be aware that unless you buy a serious mig welder you will still not be able to weld your cast aluminum subframe. You need ac power from the welder for aluminum as well as a spoolgun. Recommended brands are miller, lincoln, linde, powcon, panasonic, esab. Welding is really something where you get what you pay for so be warned.
Jschaffer is offline  
post #17 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-22-2005, 02:10 PM
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 15
 
Well as most have already said...cast alum is a pain in the ass......as I have the use of many and all welders at my shop.....before you try to weld a aluminum frame I would suggest you get alot of practice....if you would like, you can take an afternoon and I can let you play with many and all the styles of welding......but your best bet is to get a sub-frame from ebay or some such thing and go from there.......as to brands of welders miller/lincoln and if the funds are there alway go panasonic.......
docc97 is offline  
post #18 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-22-2005, 06:10 PM
Party on, dudes!
 
youngkow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Chicago
Posts: 418
Location: Chicago
Sportbike: Bianchimatic
Years Riding: not long enuff
How you found us: Friend
           
Send a message via AIM to youngkow
If you want to buy one just to have and play around with get a lincoln or miller 135. I think the newer models are 140. They run on 120v, and with the right shielding gas you can weld almost anything. Except the cast stuff like everyone is saying. I got the lincoln 135 with the gas kit, and it's perfect for me. I would love to drop 2g's for a miller synchrowave, but I like having my other toys. My welder can weld mild and stainless steel, and also aluminum. And as for strenght of the welds, imho, I think it will be fine for your application.

youngkow is offline  
post #19 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-22-2005, 06:34 PM
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 1,877
 
I'm gonna 2nd, 3rd, or 4th the comment about just buying a subframe. If you want to learn tig, spend 6 months in school doing it, then go get yourself a proper machine and prepare to pay for it.

I can stick, mig and Oxy/acetalene with the best of them but never got to tig in highschool. Luckily my friend took it at the Tech College and has the machine to do it......any aluminum I want welded, he'll do for free. One of these days I'll give it a shot.
taziscool is offline  
post #20 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-23-2005, 02:03 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
ClevisR6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: West
Posts: 1,009
Location: West
Sportbike: 04 Zuma, 06 Crf50
Years Riding: sho' nuff!
How you found us: Nesba
           
yeah, i'll end up buying a subframe.

my friend said we could go to his factory on the weekends and practice; they have mig, tig, and machines....
after a while, i may just try to weld the broken one.
ClevisR6 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Chicagoland Sportbikes forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome