I'm back! Trip report for Mt. McKinley inside and lots of pics. - Chicagoland Sportbikes
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post #1 of 67 (permalink) Old 06-20-2006, 07:23 PM Thread Starter
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I'm back! Trip report for Mt. McKinley inside and lots of pics.

I'm back from mountain climbing and vacationing in Alaska. I know the first thing you all want to know is if I made the summit. I won't spoil it, so you're going to have to read the daily log. I know it's long but it's worth the read.

I will say that the climb was harder than anything I've ever done, even in the army. It was not only physically hard but mentally and emotionally as well. I was in such an extreme environment that NOTHING lived there. No animals, no plants, not even bacteria. Humans were the only creatures existing on that mountain. Here's the day by day of what I did:

Day 0, Friday May 26: Today we met our guides, the rest of the team, and did the gear check. Our lead guide, Heidi, went through everything we had to make sure we had everything on the gear list and didn’t have anything extra that would weigh us down too much. I am the only American besides the guides. There are 3 Englishmen, 1 Scot, 1 Austrian, 1 Japanese, and 2 Aussies. The total is 9 climbers and 3 guides. After the gear check we went to REI and AMH to buy the gear we still needed. I need a small stuff sack for my facemask, hat, and extra thin gloves. Otherwise I’m ready to go.

Day 1, Saturday May 27: The guides picked us up at 8am and the whole team drove to Talkeetna with a stopover in Wasilla for lunch and last minute items. I almost bought some more toilet paper, but decided that one roll should be enough. Once we got to Talkeetna we went directly to the airport and got to work. We had to sort out the gear and weight everything. The pilots need to know weights so they can distribute the gear evenly across the 3 planes we’ll need to fly to the glacier. After a frenzy of activity we moved all the gear to the flight line and got in line for our turn to fly out. Unfortunately the wind had picked up while we were weighing our gear and was now blowing very hard. The planes couldn’t fly, so we waited… and waited… and waited. After 7 hours one flight of 3 planes was ready to go, and it was our turn. Heidi declined the ride and let a team of Koreans go instead. It was so late in the days that by the time we got to the glacier we would have just had to throw up the tents, sleep, and then wake up the next morning to get started. She figured we might as well get one more night in a bed then get on the first flight the next morning. So we walked back into town and found lodging. I stayed in a bunkhouse with 5 other guys from my team. The rest were in the B&B next to the bunkhouse. I got one more night in a bed and one more shower. Luxurious.

Day 2, Sunday May 28: We woke early and got some breakfast before heading over to the airport. The portions were huge. Later on the glacier I would be grateful for the large amount of food I had as a last normal meal. The weather was clear blue and 22 so the pilots were ready for us when we got to the flight line. We all helped load the small planes, each holding 4 climbers and their gear, and then strapped in the tiny seats. I was in the lead plane so we were off first. After a short take-off run we were finally on our way to Mt. McKinley. The flight was an adventure in itself. First we flew over the Alaska tundra and muskeg swamps then to the enormous Alaska Range. To get to the landing strip on the Kahiltna Glacier next to Base Camp (7,200 ft) one must fly through a break in the range called One Shot Pass. As the name suggests you have one chance to get it right. As our pilot passed through the pass it looked like we had about 20 feet of clearance beyond each wingtip to the jagged peaks of the mountains.

Landing on the glacier was slightly nerve-wracking for us climbers. The “runway” was packed snow that ran uphill at a slight right-to-left cant. Along the middle were a dozen bright plastic sleds buried nose up about 500 feet apart. These gave the pilots a sense of depth among the snow. Our pilot skimmed the runway, set the right ski down, then chopped the power and we quickly bounced to a stop. We piled out of the plane and quickly began unloading our gear. Once empty the pilot had two of us go to the other side of the plane while he and the other 2 climbers went to the tail. “Now when I tell you to push!!” When he yelled we all pushed as hard as we could and got the plane turned around so he could take off. Not something you do at Midway or O’Hare. A few seconds later the plane was rushing downhill and in the air to get another group of climbers.

After the others in our team landed we organized the gear and rigged for glacier travel. We traveled in rope teams of 4. On a glacier the main concern is falling into a crevasse. Everyone is tied together and everything is tied to the rope including packs and sleds. At first it was awkward getting everything tied and clamped down, but by day two we were all pros. The weather was beautiful and we hiked 5.5 miles pulling 40lb sleds and carrying 50lb packs to Camp 1 at 7,800ft.

Day 3, Monday May 29: Today we began to actually climb. The reason it takes to long to climb this mountain is because you double carry each section. Today we loaded our packs and sleds with gear, food, and fuel to place in a cache up at 10,500ft. I didn’t like pulling a sled so I was able to get all the stuff into my pack. It had to weigh close to 60lbs and I was glad I had trained so hard. The route seemed steep for us and it took almost all day to get up there. I could feel the air being to thin as we climbed. We used the “rest step” and “pressure breathing” to keep from getting too fatigued. These two tools would prove invaluable throughout the climb. It was bright and warm and we wore just one layer. I kept every inch of skin I could covered to keep from getting a sunburn. The snow and ice all around reflected the sunlight so you can get sunburn anywhere, even on your tongue and the roof of your mouth. Once at 10,500ft we dug a deep hole, dumped the stuff in it, covered it, marked it, and headed back down to Camp 1. That night we ate a big meal and went to sleep.

Day 4, Tuesday May 30: We awoke, ate breakfast, tore down camp, and headed out again. Today was a move day; our goal was Camp 2 at 11,000ft. The day was just like the previous one. Slow climbing, warm sunny skies, but my pack was lighter and I had a few things on the sled. We made good time getting to our cache at 10.5 but as we continued to climb the clouds moved in and it began to snow. It was still warm so I kept a light jacket on as not to overheat. Life on Denali was a constant battle not to get cold and not to sweat. If you got hot and began to sweat the minute you stopped moving the sweat would evaporate and you’d get very cold very quickly. Also it can be hard to dry wet clothing. One is always very mindful of the layers he/she is wearing.

After what seemed like eternity we entered Camp 2. Our guides found us a good spot and we began setting up camp. This high it was recommended we build snow walls around our tents waist high. Then it was dinnertime and off to bed. I slept horribly, which would happen each time I got to a new altitude. It snowed that night but the wind was calm. Early in the morning I woke up and could hardly breathe. It was like someone had a pillow over my face. I had to pee and didn’t feel like using my pee-bottle so I got out of the tent. I suddenly felt better and could breathe again. It turned out that the snow had sealed us into our tent and the 3 of us were breathing our own CO2. I excavated the tent and promptly fell asleep for a few more hours.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg team meeting.jpg (150.2 KB, 2 views)
File Type: jpg Flightline.jpg (118.6 KB, 1 views)
File Type: jpg me and our plane.jpg (119.5 KB, 1 views)
File Type: jpg Denali.jpg (74.3 KB, 1 views)
File Type: jpg Kahiltna International.jpg (114.9 KB, 1 views)

Never a bad time to climb... unless the weather is really horrible, and then you climb inside!

I bleed GREEN
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post #2 of 67 (permalink) Old 06-20-2006, 07:26 PM Thread Starter
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Day 5, Wednesday May 31: Today was an “active rest” day. We got up late, ate a late breakfast then rigged up and went down to retrieve our cache. It took about 45 minutes to walk down there, which was about 1/3 of the time it took to climb the same span the day before. After loading our packs and sleds we filled in the hole and headed back up to Camp 2. The rest of the day we worked on our snow walls and relaxed in the kitchen tent, called the Mid. That night one of our guides, Durney, made pizza. I don’t know if it was being on the mountain, but that stuff rivaled the best pizza I’ve had here in Chicago. Throughout the expedition we ate very very well. Each night we had a big dinner. Each morning we had a big breakfast and throughout the day we had plenty of snack food. I was actually worried I’d gain weight on the climb.

Day 6, Thursday June 1: Each one of us was feeling strong and well. No one had any symptoms of altitude sickness so Heidi decided to forgo a rest day and put a cache up at 13,500ft. The distance was shorter, but the climb was much steeper and we’d have to go around the notorious Windy Corner. We left the snowshoes and donned crampons. From here on out if we left camp we’d have them on. With ice ax in hand and pack on my back we were off up Motorcycle Hill. Once on top of that we were out of the clouds and got our first view of the Alaska Range below us. A slight tear came to my eye and I leaned over to Paddy, one of the Brits. “Oh yeah,” I said, “This is why I climb.” He laughed in agreement. After some pictures, food, and water we headed out and up Squirrel Hill. Both of these “hills” were steep, something like 40-42 degrees. But the snow was soft and we had a relatively easy time kicking steps.

We rested again at the top of Squirrel Hill then crossed the flat area called the Polo Field. Then it was uphill again to Windy Ridge. At the top we saw 2 US Army Chinooks with skis flying up to Basin Camp. It seems the day before a woman fell and snapped her right tib/fib in her leg. She was in the medical tent up there and got a flight out to the hospital. I didn’t know army choppers could fly this high.

The sun was still out and the air was calm, so around Windy Corner we went. At 13,500 we dug a hole and dropped our cache. I took a picture of my altimeter watch since this was my new personal high point. From here on out each step I took was a new record for me. We stayed at the cache awhile talking with other climbers from other teams. When it was time to go I stood up and started walking with my rope team. An intense wave of nausea swept over me but I fought it. It stayed with me until I got to camp and I began to worry that I was starting to see the effects of altitude. Over dinner I found out I wasn’t the only one who felt this way, so did most of the climbers and even the guides. It wasn’t altitude sickness it was heat stroke. We’d stayed up there too long. After some food and water I felt fine and slept great that night.

Day 7, Friday June 2: Another move day, this time up to Basin Camp at 14,200ft. It was also a move day for many other climbers in Camp 2 and they got a head start. But they didn’t know how motivated we were. We caught up to the first rope team at the top of Squirrel Hill and passed them. They didn’t want us to pass and didn’t yield the packed trail. So we had to slog through the powder. No biggie… at least that’s what I thought at first. Something happened to Heidi and she put it in overdrive. We ended up passing 3 rope teams and catching a 4th by the time we climbed to Windy Ridge. I called it the Polo Field Sprint. I was exhausted, as was everyone else. But we still had a lot of climbing to do. We stayed behind the 4th rope team and followed them past our cache where they stopped to rest. We kept going and continued to Basin Camp. It was still sunny but as we got higher I could feel the temperature dropping.

We finally got into camp and Heidi had the team drop packs so we could rest while she and the other guides went to find a site. Exhausted I dropped my load and downed the last bit of water in my bottle. I then looked around and realized where I was. After 20+ months of training and planning I was at the famous Basin Camp. The view of Mt. Foraker and Mt. Hunter was incredible. I was almost as high as they were. I could see the vast Alaska Range stretching out beyond and a sea of clouds below me. My emotions overwhelmed me and my eyes welled up with tears. One more camp and then I’d get my shot at the summit.

Heidi found a good spot and we set to work getting the tents up and the walls built. Up here we needed taller walls, shoulder height, but still only a single block thick. Up at 17,200 (High Camp) we’d need some bomber walls to protect us from the winds.

Basin Camp is a large shallow bowl on the glacier that’s safe to walk around because there aren’t any crevasses. The National Park Service has a staff of rangers during the climbing season and a doctor. This is the busiest camp and can have anywhere between 30-300 climbers at any time. It wasn’t bad when we got in, maybe 45-50 climbers waiting to go up or down. There are 2 pit toilets, one with an actual toilet seat. That was a luxury after having to use CMC’s (clean mountain cans) for the past week. Morale was still pretty good.

Day 8, Saturday June 3: Today was another “active rest” day. We went down the short distance to 13,500 and retrieved our cache. The weather was still pretty good and none of us thought much about what was coming. The rest of the day we lounged around. That night the wind began to blow in earnest and it was cold. The NPS clocked the gusts at 44mph and the ambient temp was around –12F. I slept like crap with the wind whipping our tent, but I wasn’t afraid like I was on Whitney. Our walls were strong and our tent was anchored well.

Day 9, Sunday June 4: Heidi felt we were doing very well so she gave us a rest day. After lunch we roped up and made a short hike over to “The Edge of the World.” It is the edge of the basin where camp sits and does have crevasses. It’s called “the edge” because there is a vertical drop of almost 7,000ft to the lower Kahiltna glacier. You can even see Camp 1 from the edge. It was a very cold day and the only one I wore my down coat while walking. Still, the skies were clear and we all were in good spirits.

Day 10, Monday June 5: Another cache day, but this time we would go up the hardest part of the climb: the Headwall. This section is so steep that there are permanent fixed ropes attached to the mountain. Yesterday the guides went over how to use our Ascenders on the lines and how to clip through running belays. This was a particularly tough day because two of our team had decided they’d had enough. Paddy and Chris (from England and Australia) had enough and wanted to go down. So Durney, one of our guides, took them down. It was sad to see them leave, but we had a mountain to climb and the rest of the team remained focused.

As usual we started later than the other climbers. The logistics surrounding 12 climbers from different nations is difficult, but as usual our group was strong and we caught up to everyone at the Brow, a sheltered spot on the mountain just below the fixed lines. Once it was our turn up we went. At each anchor we’d yell out, “Anchor!” and move my ascender from line to line. Once ready we’d yell out, “Go!” and the team would move again. The Headwall is so steep you can be standing vertical and when you extend your arm out you’ll be touching the ground. Add on the wind gusts, cold temps, crunching snow underfoot, thin air, and heavy packs and you can understand why I was nervous. But after an hour we made it to the top and were on the ridge. I was now standing at 16,200ft above sea level. The view was unbelievable. I could see down the other side of the range at the massive mountains, which were all below me. I felt humbled by the greatness of it all.

The original plan was to continue along the ridge up to 16,500ft and place the cache under a rock called Washburn’s Thumb. Because of our late start and the high number of climbers on the wall today Heidi decided to cache right where we were and head down before the rest of the climbers got back to the fixed lines. Good plan because after we cached our supplies and began down the fixed lines a stream of climbers appeared behind us.

Going down the fixed lines was worse than going up. For expediency the guides had us use an arm wrap around the line instead of clipping in with our ascenders. So we each wrapped the line around our left forearm, gripped the end with our hand, and headed down. I kept my eyes on the lines or the climber in front of me. This high up I didn’t want to be taking in the sights and make a misstep. Such a thing could have been fatal for not only me but also the rest of my rope team. We made it back to the brow without any missteps and then headed down the steep hill to camp. Along the way my glacier glasses iced up and I couldn’t see where I was walking. I slipped and fell and yelled out “FALLING!” My rope team immediately halted and tightened the rope. I didn’t go far but was a bit embarrassed. I stood up, cleaned off the lenses, and we were on our way again.

We got back to camp and heard on the radio that Durney, Chris, and Paddy had reached Base Camp earlier. The climbers got on a plane and were heading back to Talkeetna while Durney hooked up with another rope team and was almost at 11,000 Camp.

The weather forecast came in and it wasn’t good. A storm was approaching and was supposed to stick around for a few days. We were supposed to move to High Camp the next day but it looked like that was going to be on hold.

Day 11 through Day 17, June 6 through June 12: The storm stuck around. We ended up being pinned at 14,200ft for the remainder of our trip. Some days the wind and snow was so bad we couldn’t leave our tents but for brief trips to the latrine or to eat. Other days we were able to walk around camp and meet the other stuck climbers. On those days we played wiffleball (explaining the rules to the Brits was quite a laugh), we also played touch rugby, soccer, and we got a few hackey-sack circles going. Anything to help pass the time. I will say one thing, 14,200 is a great equalizer when playing sports. I have no soccer talent but I scored 3 goals against 2 Irish brothers. Every few minutes everyone on the field would stop like a whistle had been blown and we’d double over and huff and puff, trying to suck as much O2 down as we could, then we’d start playing again.

Up above we could see the wind absolutely nukin’ at High Camp. We could even hear it, which sounded like a jet engine going 24/7. Those at High Camp came down when they could. Down below there was a thick sea of clouds and Windy Corner was impassable. Climbers at 11,000 Camp were stuck as well. No one was moving on the mountain.

Monday June 12th was our up or down day. If the weather forecast didn’t break for at least 48 hours (one day to move up and one day for the summit bid) then we’d have to go down. No one wanted to risk going up on a good weather day and then getting stuck at High Camp. We only had enough food and fuel to last though June 16th, and we still had to climb down back to Base Camp. So Sunday night Heidi came into the Mid where we all sat awaiting the weather forecast. It was bad: Winds 35-40mph with higher gusts and snow through Wednesday night. That was it. We had run out of time and resources. The expedition was over.

After the meeting everyone went off to organize for the trip back to Base Camp. I sat alone in the Mid for awhile. I began to cry some. At first I thought the tears were because I’d missed my summit bid… but then I realized that it wasn’t about the summit, it was about the climb. For 20 months I had devoted my life to climbing this mountain. Everything I did was training, prepping, buying gear, going backpacking and climbing for experience. Denali was my life. Now it was over. It had been a great climb, I had met wonderful people, endured hardships difficult to describe, worked harder than I had ever in my life in a climate where nothing lives but humans, and I had survived. I was strong the entire climb and I suffered not even a headache due to altitude. I felt I now deserved the title “mountaineer.” It was time to go home.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg heading out.jpg (116.5 KB, 1 views)
File Type: jpg camp 1.jpg (76.2 KB, 1 views)
File Type: jpg 10500 cache.jpg (69.0 KB, 1 views)
File Type: jpg me at camp 2.jpg (86.7 KB, 1 views)
File Type: jpg move to 11.jpg (44.0 KB, 1 views)

Never a bad time to climb... unless the weather is really horrible, and then you climb inside!

I bleed GREEN

Last edited by Chills; 06-20-2006 at 08:14 PM.
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post #3 of 67 (permalink) Old 06-20-2006, 07:29 PM Thread Starter
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Day 17, Monday June 12: We left at 10am exactly and headed down. The storm was dying below us but the wind was still strong. Windy Corner lived up to its name. It was so windy that the snow had been blown away and we had nothing but blue ice to walk on. The sleds kept tipping over and we kept stumbling. Then we got to the steep parts. I was 2nd on my rope team and it was my job to keep Klaus’s sled in front of me from running into him. The whole time we went down I had this heavy sled tugging on my chest harness. Squirrel and Motorcycle Hills were the worst because of the blue ice. Also going up we about 60 climbers from 11,000 Camp. Since it was the first break in over a week there was a mass exodus of climbers trying to get up to 14,200 Camp.

Once we got to 11,000 Camp we met up with Durney. We all pulled our stuff from the cache hooked up the sleds and were off. We descended into a complete whiteout. I mean complete! It has been likened to walking inside of a ping-pong ball. I couldn’t see anything but white everywhere except Klaus in front of me. He was guiding us from wand to wand. It was the most eerie experience I ever had. You have no perception of anything around you. Thankfully the wind had died down.

We got to Base Camp after 10 hours of grueling walking. Just before Base Camp is a hill called Heartbreak Hill. I know from the bottom of my soul why it has that name. After 9 hours of going downhill you have to go back up. You feel the sled pulling on your hips; you feel the weight of the pack on your back. You are almost to camp, but you have to CLIMB again. I just wanted to quit, to lie down and not move for a week. But I kept going and we eventually rolled into camp. Heidi signed us in and told us that we were number 40 in line for a flight out. My heart sank.

Day 18, Tuesday June 13: The Base Camp director requested that all climbers get up early and go out and pack the runway from the overnight snowfall. So the 60+ climbers in camp did just that. We woke up, strapped on snowshoes, and began stamping along the “runway” packing down the snow. We walked up and down it about 4 times when the first plane flew in. A cheer went up from everyone as it touched it’s skis down and taxied around to the waiting climbers.
Soon after it took off, however, a deep gloom came over everyone. Clouds had moved through One Shot Pass and blocked the way to the glacier. No one was leaving. So we sat, and we waited, and waited, and waited. After 7 hours the pilots began circling high overhead trying to find a way in. A half hour later they found it. In a frenzy of planes landing, climbers running with their gear and loading the aircraft, and planes taking off it was our turn to fly out. Around 8pm the tiny Cessna I sat in lifted off the snow and I was on my way back to civilization.

After we landed we each got to grab our street clothes and change. I was walking funny wearing shoes after walking in 6lb mountaineering boots and 2lb crampons for 3 weeks. I also saw myself in the mirror for the first time. I looked like a mountaineer. My beard was long and shaggy, my face and hands dark and burned, and I had raccoon eyes from wearing my glacier glasses religiously.

When everyone had landed we all walked into town to the West Rib. We wolfed down burgers and ales, laughed and patted each other on the back. We all were disappointed about not summiting, but looking at us you would never be able to tell. Later Nick, one of the Brits, would say this about our climb, “It was like you trained intensely for a marathon then ran it. When you were ¾ of the way through you look at your watch and realize you were 3 minutes ahead and then someone out of the crowd steps in front of you with his hand up. ‘Stop’ he says and you stop. ‘I want to keep going, I’m doing well, I’m strong,’ you tell him and he just shakes his head and repeats, ‘stop.’” That’s how our climb was. We just had to stop. But that’s the nature of climbing, especially Denali. Sometimes you have to just stop and when it’s time you must turn around.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg the mid.jpg (101.4 KB, 1 views)
File Type: jpg hanging in the mid.jpg (81.1 KB, 2 views)
File Type: jpg top of moto hill.jpg (72.4 KB, 1 views)
File Type: jpg resting at top motohill.jpg (59.7 KB, 1 views)
File Type: jpg around windy corner.jpg (56.2 KB, 1 views)

Never a bad time to climb... unless the weather is really horrible, and then you climb inside!

I bleed GREEN
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post #4 of 67 (permalink) Old 06-20-2006, 07:30 PM Thread Starter
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Here are more pictures.
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File Type: jpg new high point.jpg (56.9 KB, 0 views)
File Type: jpg arrive at 14.jpg (85.4 KB, 1 views)
File Type: jpg basin camp from headwall.jpg (59.7 KB, 1 views)
File Type: jpg basin camp.jpg (38.4 KB, 1 views)
File Type: jpg colorado ski girls.jpg (67.0 KB, 1 views)

Never a bad time to climb... unless the weather is really horrible, and then you climb inside!

I bleed GREEN
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post #5 of 67 (permalink) Old 06-20-2006, 07:31 PM Thread Starter
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And more pictures.
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File Type: jpg edge of the world.jpg (86.7 KB, 0 views)
File Type: jpg edge view.jpg (81.6 KB, 1 views)
File Type: jpg me at 16200.jpg (82.3 KB, 0 views)
File Type: jpg nasty clouds over summit.jpg (56.1 KB, 0 views)
File Type: jpg official nps forecast.jpg (66.8 KB, 1 views)

Never a bad time to climb... unless the weather is really horrible, and then you climb inside!

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post #6 of 67 (permalink) Old 06-20-2006, 07:32 PM
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Id say you earned it!!!!
You can say youve done what very few others have! Congrats and happy belated birthday!!!

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post #7 of 67 (permalink) Old 06-20-2006, 07:33 PM Thread Starter
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File Type: jpg rest on move day.jpg (66.8 KB, 0 views)
File Type: jpg snow walls at 14.jpg (73.6 KB, 0 views)
File Type: jpg wiffleball.jpg (45.8 KB, 0 views)
File Type: jpg soccer time out.jpg (51.8 KB, 0 views)
File Type: jpg windstorm and two latrines.jpg (52.4 KB, 0 views)

Never a bad time to climb... unless the weather is really horrible, and then you climb inside!

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post #8 of 67 (permalink) Old 06-20-2006, 07:35 PM Thread Starter
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File Type: jpg view from 16200.jpg (74.2 KB, 1 views)
File Type: jpg storm below us.jpg (39.7 KB, 0 views)
File Type: jpg waiting at basecamp.jpg (89.6 KB, 0 views)
File Type: jpg white out descent.jpg (29.6 KB, 0 views)
File Type: jpg my ride at last.jpg (107.3 KB, 0 views)
File Type: jpg burger at the west rib.jpg (109.9 KB, 2 views)

Never a bad time to climb... unless the weather is really horrible, and then you climb inside!

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post #9 of 67 (permalink) Old 06-20-2006, 07:36 PM
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Damn that is amazing Good job man!

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post #10 of 67 (permalink) Old 06-20-2006, 07:37 PM
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Welcome back!!!! (i'll read this later when I have time.)




HDTony.... Damn glad to meet you!

Government's view of the economy could be summed up in a few short phrases: If it moves, tax it. If it keeps moving, regulate it. And if it stops moving, subsidize it.

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post #11 of 67 (permalink) Old 06-20-2006, 07:38 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks guys. There is one more picture I need to add. She said yes!
Attached Images
File Type: jpg proposal1.jpg (92.1 KB, 2 views)

Never a bad time to climb... unless the weather is really horrible, and then you climb inside!

I bleed GREEN
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post #12 of 67 (permalink) Old 06-20-2006, 07:39 PM
.
 
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Holy shit you're alive.
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post #13 of 67 (permalink) Old 06-20-2006, 07:46 PM
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Oh and welcome back to the world of kawasakis, hot showers, and toilets.
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post #14 of 67 (permalink) Old 06-20-2006, 07:51 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimzx9r
Oh and welcome back to the world of kawasakis, hot showers, and toilets.
Thanks, bro. I sure did miss those things. I'd lay in my tent during those storms and think how awesome it would be to ride my 10 in the warm sun.

Never a bad time to climb... unless the weather is really horrible, and then you climb inside!

I bleed GREEN
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post #15 of 67 (permalink) Old 06-20-2006, 07:53 PM
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Wow. That rocks. so are you going to try again?

Congrats on getting back in one piece and finding someone that will put up with you!

There is nothing firm, nothing balanced, nothing durable in all the universe. Nothing remains in its original state, each day, each hour, each moment, there is change. Change is the essence of life. Embrace change as you do life. To fight change is to live in the past.
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post #16 of 67 (permalink) Old 06-20-2006, 07:57 PM
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Welcome back bro, and congrats!
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post #17 of 67 (permalink) Old 06-20-2006, 08:09 PM
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Amazing! Respect and congrats! The particular point of the mountain is not that important. Really important thing is - you made your own summit.
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post #18 of 67 (permalink) Old 06-20-2006, 08:12 PM
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Awesome write-up and pictures Chills.

What a life changing experience this has been for you. My hat goes off to people like you who train and brave such harsh elements just for sport. Damn that seems like a long time to be on a mountain.

Congratulations on your accomplishment and your proposal.
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post #19 of 67 (permalink) Old 06-20-2006, 08:12 PM
1 piece at a time
 
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Congrats and welx back!

- Steve
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post #20 of 67 (permalink) Old 06-20-2006, 08:17 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks everyone. I can't wait to see you all at Strats next week (I work tomorrow ).

It was definately an experience of a lifetime. I don't see myself going back anytime in the next few years. There are other mountains to climb... I'd really like to climb in Antarctica. Plus I've got a wedding and honeymoon to save up for.

Never a bad time to climb... unless the weather is really horrible, and then you climb inside!

I bleed GREEN
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post #21 of 67 (permalink) Old 06-20-2006, 08:39 PM
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welcome back, hope all went well, when i get a chance ill read everything.

i am just glad your back ok.



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post #22 of 67 (permalink) Old 06-20-2006, 08:45 PM
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Glad your back in one peice.

Nice sign.

Gang aft a glee

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post #23 of 67 (permalink) Old 06-20-2006, 09:00 PM
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Waaaayyyyy cooooooollllll. Welcome back.

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post #24 of 67 (permalink) Old 06-20-2006, 09:02 PM
 
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Great write up Chills, congrats on both accounts.
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post #25 of 67 (permalink) Old 06-20-2006, 09:41 PM
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Congrats man, After a long day of snowboarding I want off of the mountain, I couldn't imagine that. Thanks for the pics, I now have Desktop Wallpaper for the entire year. With the heat around here the past few weeks, it wouldn't have been to bad to stick our heads in a freezer .

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"Ride it like you have 30 monthly remaining payments" should keep most people out of trouble.
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post #26 of 67 (permalink) Old 06-20-2006, 10:04 PM
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Great job Chris!





Any pics of Heidi with less gear on?
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post #27 of 67 (permalink) Old 06-20-2006, 10:09 PM
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Welcome Back!!

What a great story and great pics.

Congrats on the engagement as well.

===========
Great Quote - One would think that the Secret Service was smart enough to get serviced secretly.

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post #28 of 67 (permalink) Old 06-20-2006, 10:35 PM
 
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Wow dude ! I was wondering how you were doing !! Glad you made it back safe and congrats on what you got accomplished. More than I could ever do. Xcellent pics !
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post #29 of 67 (permalink) Old 06-20-2006, 10:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chills
Thanks guys. There is one more picture I need to add. She said yes!

OMG! You are quite the memory maker Mr. Chills!

Congrats on the Climb, and on the engagement!

Happy Belated Birthday as well!

Busa /Ducati/HDGirl
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post #30 of 67 (permalink) Old 06-20-2006, 11:06 PM
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Congrats!!!! Wonderful write-up and amazing pics!

Ride smart... stupid hurts.

Everyone crashes. Some get back on. Some don't. Some can't...

Godspeed 788!!! We miss you!
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