Attn:track newbs (sort of..) - Chicagoland Sportbikes
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post #1 of 35 (permalink) Old 04-14-2008, 12:16 AM Thread Starter
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Attn:track newbs (sort of..)

Ok, first, let me say I don't know exactly where I'm going with this thread; it's kind of a PSA, kind of a heads-up to new trackday participants, but mostly, it's kind of a personal rant/vent session. I've been thinking about how I wanted to write this for a long time, but I think the best way to do it is just to start typing, so here goes.

This year will be my fifth year riding on the track, and my fourth year of fairly hardcore attendance as I only did 3 weekends my first year. I usually average 20+ days a year at the track (not counting the first year), and I've learned tons out there. I like to think I've become a fairly proficient and fast rider, but I know I can still learn tons more, and I also know that there are tons of guys who are way faster than I am. Still, I go out, I have fun, and I try to come home in one piece, but it doesn't always work out in the most optimal fashion. This is a very risky passion, and the margin for error can be razor thin at times; moreover, that margin becomes thinner the faster I go, even though I'm more experienced every time I complete a session. Like any activity, there is a learning curve associated with track riding, but it's decidedly steeper than most.

No problem; life is really just a long, drawn out risk/benefit equation wherein we make our choices as to how we want to live and we then live with the consequences. I know that riding at the track is dangerous, but, at this point, the enjoyment, thrill, and therapeutic benefit which I derive from this activity far outweigh the element of risk involved. I fully realize that any perception of control which I have regarding riding at the track is illusory at best; after all, I am participating in an incredibly dangerous pastime, and, moreover, I'm constantly pushing the envelope while doing so. Anything can happen, at any time, and it usually does. I've crashed four times in as many years, and three of those times I got up, dusted myself off, and was, physically at least, ready to go back out the next session. Mentally, and, with regards to the bike, mechanically, maybe not so much. As far as my body, though, I was ok fine. That fourth time, though? That was a different story.

Now, believe me, I'm not trying to be overly dramatic here, as the only injury I incurred that fourth time was a broken collarbone. Fractured clavicles are actually a very common injury at the track; they usually occur when you fall off the bike and jam your elbow, which forces the collarbone up into the bottom edge of your helmet, and Voila! you no longer get to wear strapless gowns out for nights on the town. (And don't even
try to use this in your arguments, helmet haters, because believe me, I'd have been dead and gone before I stopped tumbling without my lid!) I know several ex-racers who've broken their collarbones 3 or 4 times; look around on a hot day at the track and you'll see plenty of clavicles crooked and lumpy enough to make you slightly queasy. Problem is, I'm a plumber, and it's kind of hard to do a physical trade with a broken bone which can't really mend in any way except with the passage of time. So, I was off work for a full month, which cost me about 7 grand or so. Plus, there was the damage to the bike, the portion of my medical bills which insurance didn't cover, and the destroyed gear. All in all, this accident, which was a direct result of my hobby, cost me probably ten thousand dollars.

At this point, I can actually hear you thinking, "So what? Nobody forced you to go out there. You were probably riding over your head, doing something stupid, and you got what you deserved. You said yourself how risky this is, and you're lucky that's all that happened to you. Now quit moaning like a little bitch and let me go bash some latte-swilling, cafe-posing Ducati owners!" And you know what? You're partly right. I know it's risky out there, and I totally accept the ultimate responsibility for what happened. However, and this is finally one of the points of this post, this crash was caused wholly and completely by another rider, who was absolutely riding over his head, and definitely doing something stupid, and I'm fairly certain that I didn't get what I deserved out of the whole deal.

I won't go into too much detail here. A lot of people here already know enough about the specifics, and the details don't matter that much anyway. In a nutshell, I was acting as a rider coach (my first and last day in that capacity, for obvious reasons), and during the last session of the day, a rider went down behind me, slid under me, and hit the front wheel of my bike as I was entering a turn. I was never sure exactly what happened at the time, even though there were tons of riders all around us. These things happen very fast, though, and I'm sure most of the other riders were way more concerned about not crashing than trying to catalog the sequence of events.

My suspicions regarding what happened, however, were confirmed exactly one year later at the same event when I met a couple of guys who had watched the whole thing happen from the edge of the track. Quite simply, they said the guy was going like a bat out of hell, got to the corner, realized he was going way too fast, and promptly locked up the brakes and pitched his bike down the tarmac. I'm fairly positive, no, I'm certain that he was fixated on me and just trying to keep up. Thing is, I already had a few years under my belt, and was riding at a 5/10ths pace, while he was riding at a decidedly higher level with regards to his actual abilities. Part of the reason I know this is that he didn't even realize that I was a rider coach, despite the bright orange vest I was wearing which clearly indicated that I was an instructor.

So, (and forgive me for sounding petulant, but as I said, this post is also a rant/vent) I'm out there trying to help less experienced riders become better riders, and this fucking bonehead comes out of nowhere and creams me from behind, causing me quite a bit of physical discomfort and a fair amount of financial hardship. Again, let me reiterate, I accept the ultimate responsibility here. If I was somewhere else, doing something else, this would have never happened. It did, though, and it's at least 49% the other rider's fault.

And this brings me to another point of this post. Track riding rocks. It is the most intense, rewarding, and exciting activity I've taken part in so far in this lifetime. It is a non-stop, adrenaline-riddled realtime video game on crack. But, as previously mentioned, it's dangerous. Now pay attention: it's dangerous for everyone on the track, not just you, which means that you need to check your ego at the gate. Most days, everyone goes out, has a great day, has a few beers while loading up gear, and goes home happy and elated, which is as it should be. Other times, people get hurt. A lot of times, it's unavoidable, and it's really nobody's fault. A fair amount of the time, though, somebody does something stupid. Maybe they don't signal correctly when they're exiting the track. Maybe they cross over the blend line. Maybe they don't obey group passing rules. Maybe they think that they are just about to be discovered and offered a ride in MotoGP. Whatever. There are probably 679 things you can do wrong out there, any one of which can injure or kill you or your fellow riders, and you owe it to everyone to do whatever you can to avoid making these mistakes. This means paying attention during rider meetings, listening to your instructors, following the rules, and remembering that basically, you generally aren't nearly as fast, talented, or gnarly as you fancy yourself to be. Believe me, I know tons of guys who are way, waaay faster than me (and I'm way faster than you), and they don't even hold a candle to AMA backmarkers. So chill out, listen up, have fun, and most of all, pay attention, because it just ain't fair that somebody else might have to pay the price for your fuckup.

Forgive me, please. I don't mean to lecture. All in all, I was lucky. My wife works, I have no kids, I wasn't in any danger of losing my house. Still, though, what if I was hurt worse? It could happen; I really don't even like to think about that. But it didn't, and it's cool, and I'm riding more than ever, so it's all good. Like I said, I'm not trying to be overly dramatic. There is a final point for this post, though, and it might be the main one. See, the guy who hit me works in the motorcycle industry, and he promised me a new piece of gear since the one I was wearing was totally destroyed. Now mind you, he wasn't in any way obligated to compensate me whatsoever; those are the rules of the game - I have that ultimate responsibility as soon as I get on the track. But he offered, and I'll be damned if I don't hold a guy to his word when he makes a promise. I tried to hook up with him all last year, but we didn't manage to get together, and that was ok. This year, however, I'm going racing, and I really need spare everything. I've tried to get ahold of him several times, and he won't even call me back. The last time I left him a message, I asked him to at least call me back and at least tell me he couldn't,or wouldn't, keep his promise, but he's not even man enough to do that. I've seen this guy at bike nights, and I assume he's on the board. Hell, for all I know, he might be someone I talk to on here fairly regularly. And I hope he is on here, because I want him to see this. You suck, dude. Your actions cost me thousands, and you won't even live up to your word and shell out a few hundred bucks to buy me some gear at your cost. If we're ever at the same place together, don't even bother looking at me, because I'm more than a little pissed off at your no promise keepin' ass.

There. I think I feel a bit better now.

Quote:
Originally Posted by maoisn View Post
There will always be a better ride out there. It's not the bike that bends, it's the rider. There is no spoon.
CCS/ASRA #904

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Yep, still.


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post #2 of 35 (permalink) Old 04-14-2008, 12:28 AM
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One thing I learned fairly quickly. Don't get on the track if you are not financial ready to throw away your bike and spend alot of time off work. I spent 6 months of my life in a wheelchair after a mishap during a race at Road America. Don't depend on anyone but yourself when you get out there. I would just forget the situation and move on. It is tough thing to do. Sorry about your misfortunes on that.

****Edited because of my horrible spelling****

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post #3 of 35 (permalink) Old 04-14-2008, 12:34 AM Thread Starter
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Absolutely, dude. Like I said, common injury, could've been way worse, and I know and accept the risk. I don't even compare it to your injury. Still, I kind of wrote it as a PSA to perhaps promote some thought on the part of those considering going to the track; who knows? Maybe it'll encourage someone to be more careful than they might have otherwise been, or, maybe it'll discourage someone who shouldn't go.

Like I said, I thought about what I wanted to say for a long time, but I decided to just start typing. I definitely don't mean to imply that I'm really pissed any more or self-pitying in any way. It's history, and you're right; if you can't pay, you shouldn't play.

Oh, but I do want to let the guy who hit me know what a dick I think he is.

Quote:
Originally Posted by maoisn View Post
There will always be a better ride out there. It's not the bike that bends, it's the rider. There is no spoon.
CCS/ASRA #904

Sponsored by: TeamMCC.com

Yep, still.


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post #4 of 35 (permalink) Old 04-14-2008, 01:15 AM
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VERY GOOD points.

well written!



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post #5 of 35 (permalink) Old 04-14-2008, 05:45 AM
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7 grand a month, wow! good read
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post #6 of 35 (permalink) Old 04-14-2008, 06:22 AM
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Jim should be required reading for all track days junkies.

Sometimes goodbye is your second chance.
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post #7 of 35 (permalink) Old 04-14-2008, 06:28 AM
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good write up!
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post #8 of 35 (permalink) Old 04-14-2008, 06:59 AM
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Good write up. It was long, but worth the read.
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post #9 of 35 (permalink) Old 04-14-2008, 07:39 AM
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Yep, well written. Best of luck to you.

Sorry to hear that "he" isn't a stand-up person. That sucks!

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post #10 of 35 (permalink) Old 04-14-2008, 08:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by G2G View Post
One thing I learned fairly quickly. Don't get on the track if you are not financial ready to throw away your bike and spend alot of time off work. I spent 6 months of my life in a wheelchair after a mishap durning a race at Road America. Don't depend on anyone but yourself when you get out there. I would jus forget the situation and move on. It is tought thing to do. Sorry about your misfortunes on that.
This is probably the main reason for me not getting my bike out on the track. I have been running cars on the track for about ten years and have seen what one tiny mistake can cost if it comes at the worst possible time. I have the same mentality that a track vehicle, be it a bike or a car, are disposeable. While it may be unlikely that I wad up a bike on my first track day, its possible. Factor in a much greater risk for personal injury, and its easy to see that I could lose everything. I could not afford to replace a bike, cover medical expenses or miss any time from work. Farmboys story is a perfect example. I could pay attention in the riders meeting, listen to my instructors, and ride within my limits and still end up in a tire wall because someone else didnt. Im not sure if I am ready for that responsibility yet. There is alot to lose out there, but I also feel at times I am putting myself at greater risk by not improving my riding skills. Everything that was said about the track should apply equally if not more to the street. It will be an interesting season to say the least.
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post #11 of 35 (permalink) Old 04-14-2008, 09:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Farmboy69 View Post
Track riding rocks. It is the most intense, rewarding, and exciting activity I've taken part in so far in this lifetime. It is a non-stop, adrenaline-riddled realtime video game on crack. But, as previously mentioned, it's dangerous. Now pay attention: it's dangerous for everyone on the track, not just you, which means that you need to check your ego at the gate.


great write up Jim..

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post #12 of 35 (permalink) Old 04-14-2008, 09:35 AM
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i was there for the day of this incident, props to you Jim for taking on the role of rider coach that day and trying to help your fellow riders improve their own skills. as this story points out, the rider coaches / CR's dont get enough praise for the risks they subject themselves to. all it takes is one individual making bad decisions to put everyone in the group at risk.
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post #13 of 35 (permalink) Old 04-14-2008, 09:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bhauditech View Post
This is probably the main reason for me not getting my bike out on the track. I have been running cars on the track for about ten years and have seen what one tiny mistake can cost if it comes at the worst possible time. I have the same mentality that a track vehicle, be it a bike or a car, are disposeable. While it may be unlikely that I wad up a bike on my first track day, its possible. Factor in a much greater risk for personal injury, and its easy to see that I could lose everything. I could not afford to replace a bike, cover medical expenses or miss any time from work. Farmboys story is a perfect example. I could pay attention in the riders meeting, listen to my instructors, and ride within my limits and still end up in a tire wall because someone else didnt. Im not sure if I am ready for that responsibility yet. There is alot to lose out there, but I also feel at times I am putting myself at greater risk by not improving my riding skills. Everything that was said about the track should apply equally if not more to the street. It will be an interesting season to say the least.
Just remember though, these accidents are far and few between. Don't let it deture (sp) you. Just be aware. It's knowledge andknowledge is half the battle!
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post #14 of 35 (permalink) Old 04-14-2008, 09:41 AM
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Excellent post Farmboy. Thanks for taking the time.

As a new track rider with 3.5 track days in my career, there is one more thing that i'd like to add, and i was able to understand the first time i went out there.

I didn't have any sleep, but in the morning I was still feeling fit.
So I went out for 3 sessions, and after the 3rd session, no matter how much fun I had, I decided that it was enough, because I felt I was getting tired.
I figured I spent, what, less than $200 bucks on a track day. Losing half of that is a lot less than what I could lose if I keep riding and make a mistake.
So I quit for the day and spent the rest of the day watching others.
That was the best decision that I could make, although it was so much fun and I wanted to be out there. I figured there will be a lot more track days, and hell there were ;-)

Oh well, the last one wasn't as good, but I sure wasn't going over my head...
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post #15 of 35 (permalink) Old 04-14-2008, 10:25 AM
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Good post. I am toying with bringing the bike to the track this year for the first time. The whole injury thing and being off work constantly lurks in the back of my mind. That along with finding someone to take my butt and bike over there. Since I have never done this I have nothing but gear and a bike. No trailer, tent, gas can etc......... I need to be someones track bitch. Newbie to the track would be an understatement.

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post #16 of 35 (permalink) Old 04-14-2008, 12:08 PM
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I say we find homeboy, tie him up and go work on him with a pair of plyers and a blow torch...

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post #17 of 35 (permalink) Old 04-14-2008, 12:24 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grasshopper View Post
I say we find homeboy, tie him up and go work on him with a pair of plyers and a blow torch...
Nick, you're definitely my main hard pipe-hittin' hillbilly.

And to everyone who is new to the track or considering it, by all means, I absolutely encourage it. Not only will you improve your skills and have a complete blast, you'll make tons of new friends to boot. Extremely intense activities breed intense relationships, and I've met a whole bunch of people, from all walks of life, who i'm sure I'll know for a long time. This is but another benefit of this pastime.

This post was, more or less, just a alcohol-enhanced rant. Don't let it freak you out; just file it away for future consideration.

Quote:
Originally Posted by maoisn View Post
There will always be a better ride out there. It's not the bike that bends, it's the rider. There is no spoon.
CCS/ASRA #904

Sponsored by: TeamMCC.com

Yep, still.


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post #18 of 35 (permalink) Old 04-14-2008, 12:57 PM
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Good right up, I would be darn pissed if that happened to me. It is even worse that you were a rider coach with a big ass orange shirt on. There is no reason for a rider to take anyone out on a track day. This guy pulls a Carlos Checa move on you for what reason. At least on WSBK, it was for a win on the final turn in Spain, why do that kind of stuff on a local track day. Then to top it off he makes a promise to get you some gear and can't even follow through with it .

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"Ride it like you have 30 monthly remaining payments" should keep most people out of trouble.
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post #19 of 35 (permalink) Old 04-14-2008, 01:18 PM
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I have only done a couple trackdays, but I can't fathom how somebody actually makes contact with another rider. What a dipshit.
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post #20 of 35 (permalink) Old 04-14-2008, 01:51 PM
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Nice rant!


Your posts are always worth reading, I hope this dude comes through with his promise. Good luck on your race season.

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post #21 of 35 (permalink) Old 04-14-2008, 02:16 PM
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Was this in advanced group? Nesba or STT? Reason I ask is cuz it says 'attn to track newbs' and thats me, but I know in STT they didnt allow passing in the B group but in Nesba they do. Would this make Nesba more dangerous?

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post #22 of 35 (permalink) Old 04-14-2008, 02:24 PM
i need a new bike, this one is trashed
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ahhyeah1212 View Post
Was this in advanced group? Nesba or STT? Reason I ask is cuz it says 'attn to track newbs' and thats me, but I know in STT they didnt allow passing in the B group but in Nesba they do. Would this make Nesba more dangerous?
Being allowed to is one thing following the rules is another. I had multiple people pass me in STT "B" group and it was worse cos I wasn't expecting it.
Overall NESBA has more regulation I think but that can be a bad thing and/or a good thing depending on which way you look at it.
Advanced is pretty much free for all whichever organization so if someone is over their head they really have no business riding in advanced.
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post #23 of 35 (permalink) Old 04-14-2008, 02:26 PM
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Good post

A superior rider uses superior judgment to avoid situations that require superior skill.
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post #24 of 35 (permalink) Old 04-14-2008, 03:30 PM

 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Farmboy69 View Post
So chill out, listen up, have fun, and most of all, pay attention, because it just ain't fair that somebody else might have to pay the price for your fuckup.

There is a final point for this post, though, and it might be the main one. See, the guy who hit me works in the motorcycle industry, and he promised me a new piece of gear since the one I was wearing was totally destroyed. Now mind you, he wasn't in any way obligated to compensate me whatsoever; those are the rules of the game - I have that ultimate responsibility as soon as I get on the track. But he offered, and I'll be damned if I don't hold a guy to his word when he makes a promise. I tried to hook up with him all last year, but we didn't manage to get together, and that was ok. This year, however, I'm going racing, and I really need spare everything. I've tried to get ahold of him several times, and he won't even call me back. The last time I left him a message, I asked him to at least call me back and at least tell me he couldn't,or wouldn't, keep his promise, but he's not even man enough to do that. I've seen this guy at bike nights, and I assume he's on the board. Hell, for all I know, he might be someone I talk to on here fairly regularly. And I hope he is on here, because I want him to see this.

You suck, dude. Your actions cost me thousands, and you won't even live up to your word and shell out a few hundred bucks to buy me some gear at your cost. If we're ever at the same place together, don't even bother looking at me, because I'm more than a little pissed off at your no promise keepin' ass.
I'm so conflicted by your post. Where did this come from? You explain the possible risks of track riding. You express your love for track riding. The good, the bad. You took the responsibility to help others learn and grow to appreciate something your passionate about.

Then you type this? I can't say I completely understand your point of view. That would be rude as I've never been in this situation. But I can certainly relate to the scenario and took these same risks as you did, just yesterday for myself.

I've seen my share of crashes. I've talked to riders who've crashed. I've talked to riders that have been crashed by someone else. I've seen riders have bad days. I've shared in the reward of helping people have some of the most fun they've ever had. But I certainly wouldn't reflect upon the bad on the board and title it as something new riders should read. I'm also not saying motorcycle riding is all party favors and cotton candy, there are down sides to every thing in life.

Deep down inside I have to believe that a rider that makes an error that causes another rider to run off track, crash and possibly even be injured would feel terrible. People deal with stress and emotion different. I'm sure the individual that crashed you would have said anything to help you forgive them at the moment and help themselves deal with the emotions they were feeling. But to call them out and tell them they suck and to avoid you? Thats just not cool.

If your someone that appreciates challenges and rewards in life, accept what has happened and learn from it. Extend a hand and express a willingness to help this person become a better and safer rider. That will have a much bigger impact on a person.

You can assume you know what the rider did or was thinking. The rider themselves being a new rider probably can't even tell you what was going on in their mind at that moment. Riding the track at speed is sensory overload until you develop your abilities and learn to process everything thats going on.

I'm sorry you ever had to experience the things that fill this post. I hope that you don't take my post wrong either. I have to imagine that every one of us that goes out each weekend to work with new riders has these very same concerns in the back of our minds.

I know you love the track and hopefully we'll see you out there soon. I hope getting this out and sharing helped you. There are so many things that could happen in a day that could change the rest of my life. I try to fill each day with as much joy and personal reward as I can and share those days with friends and family. Then I know I've truly lived. The track is a huge part of my life. Some of my fondest memories are from track riding. The friendships I've developed with other riders are ones I know will stay with me for a long time after my track riding had finished.

If you ever get the chance to coach on the track again. Even if for just one day, I hope you do so. The pride you feel in helping someone succeed in enjoying something that is your passion is incredible. I'm sorry you experienced the bad before the good.

Greg K.
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post #25 of 35 (permalink) Old 04-14-2008, 03:57 PM
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i take his post as something i do and also others every day in life.

risk for reward some prices are to high to yourself,your family, and all those that fall in line in your personal thoughts.

i use myself as an example. my wife, my family and employees relay on me on a daily basis. if i am not there to talk to, conduct,participate in full form.

i just risk loosing some or all.


risk for reward= your own personal choice and not anyone else!

track ride is just another form.

and so is WALKING YOUR DOGGIE!




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post #26 of 35 (permalink) Old 04-14-2008, 04:19 PM
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Seems to me the bullseye was painted on the guy for his breech of promise
after the crash..... rather than the crash itself.


Risk exists in everything you do, track riding has a fair amount of it.

To Ody's point if you are *willing* ( yourself ) and *able* ( family - work )
to accept the risks and mange them appropriately track riding is one of
the most rewarding things you will ever do.

If you manage yourself well the crashing percentage can be *very* low.

You cannot predict / manage the outcome of a crash, only dress for it.


Tom

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post #27 of 35 (permalink) Old 04-14-2008, 06:03 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BLARNEY View Post
Seems to me the bullseye was painted on the guy for his breech of promise
after the crash..... rather than the crash itself.

Tom
Exactly. the guy didn't have to promise me anything, but he did, and I expect him to live up to his word.

Greg, the post was fairly explanatory in most aspects, I think. This happened the year before last, I obviously still ride, and I love it. I thought for a long time about how I wanted to formulate this thread as being informative and somewhat educational to newer riders, while at the same time letting the guy who hit me know that I'm disappointed in him. If he feels bad because I'm harsh about it, you know what? Not my problem. He could have hurt me and others way worse. I'm telling you, there where a ton of riders all around us, and I was amazed he only took me and 1 other guy out (I didn't even mention that, mostly because the 3rd guy was more or less all right). What if he had killed someone? How many times have you talked to a newer rider who was way over his head, only to have him give you every reason under the sun as to why he's doing it all wrong EXCEPT that he really just doesn't know what he's doing?

I didn't specify in my post that this guy wasn't a totally new rider. He told me he had done a few other days. He also told me that the bike had been squirrelly all day while he was braking for this corner; I tactfully suggested that perhaps the problem might lie with him as he was riding a brand new R6, and I've yet to see a newer rider find the limits of one of those, but he didn't really get it. Believe me, this guy was over his head. If I was dicing it out with another experienced rider such as yourself, Wink, Grasshopper, etc, and you crashed me out, I wouldn't be too bothered by it at all, because we have similar abilities and it's a blast to race with someone you know and trust, but sometimes, shit happens. If, on the other hand, another rider stuffs me or hits me just because his ego can't handle the fact that I might be faster than him, well, that's not cool at all. More times than I can count, I've had riders in front of me slow down to enter a corner just to speed back up and actually run me off the track when they realized I was passing them, and I was executing a safe pass. That's ego, and that's bullshit. Believe me, I have never, and will never, run another rider off the track or otherwise jeopardize his safety because I'm upset that he's getting by me. That kind of thing shouldn't happen in racing, much less track days.

It seems from the replies that most everyone got my point, which was that this is a serious sport, with serious consequences to mistakes, so people should take it seriously. Too many (1 would be too many) meatheads go out on the track with no regard whatsoever for the safety of their fellow riders, and that's just wrong. Of course this sport rocks. I would never disparage it in any way. I will, however, speak up if and when I see someone posing a hazard to others, and I'll also relate my personal experiences if it helps someone to understand another aspect of the sport, whether it's a positive or negative. This was just a little more detailed than the warnings which are issued at every rider meeting.

As to me teaching again, I won't say never, but at this point, it doesn't fit my risk/benefit equation. I'd love to do it; I actually went to school to be a teacher, and it's a wonderful feeling to see things click whenever you teach anybody anything about anything. Unfortunately, I had the bad luck to get nailed, and it made me realize that being on the track with less experienced riders can be more dangerous than going balls to the wall in "A" group. Of course what happened to me is a rare occurance, but if telling the tale makes one person think about the possible consequences of their actions and prevents them from making a mistake, then I contend that it's a good thing.

Trust me, I'm over the incident itself. I just consider the other rider's failure to fulfill his promise the final chapter of this epic saga. If he sees this and feels worse, good. He should. We should all feel remorse for our mistakes. Also, if we're ever in the same place, if he wants to come over and apologize to me, that would be greatly appreciated. As of now, though, I'm not terribly impressed by his integrity, or rather, lack of it.

See you at the track!

Quote:
Originally Posted by maoisn View Post
There will always be a better ride out there. It's not the bike that bends, it's the rider. There is no spoon.
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Last edited by Farmboy69; 04-14-2008 at 07:08 PM.
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post #28 of 35 (permalink) Old 04-14-2008, 06:05 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grasshopper View Post
----- with ----- 2 years ago. The crash happened at the ------. Jim was coaching in ---------. It was all my fault because I referred Jim to ----- to help us out coaching. Sorry Jim. LOL!
And Nick, I purposefully left out these details...

Quote:
Originally Posted by maoisn View Post
There will always be a better ride out there. It's not the bike that bends, it's the rider. There is no spoon.
CCS/ASRA #904

Sponsored by: TeamMCC.com

Yep, still.


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post #29 of 35 (permalink) Old 04-14-2008, 06:10 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ahhyeah1212 View Post
Was this in advanced group? Nesba or STT? Reason I ask is cuz it says 'attn to track newbs' and thats me, but I know in STT they didnt allow passing in the B group but in Nesba they do. Would this make Nesba more dangerous?
I wouldn't say either group is more dangerous than the other. There are pros and cons to each. I've ridden with both since I've started, I still do, and I'd tell anyone to do the same, bcause that way, you can go to the track a lot more frequently! I've said it before, I'll ride with anyone who'll have me....

Quote:
Originally Posted by maoisn View Post
There will always be a better ride out there. It's not the bike that bends, it's the rider. There is no spoon.
CCS/ASRA #904

Sponsored by: TeamMCC.com

Yep, still.


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post #30 of 35 (permalink) Old 04-14-2008, 09:58 PM
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Track riding is such a high risk activity and so many things can go wrong, but it is also so rewarding. I consider myself lucky that so far the benefits greatly outweigh any mishaps I've encountered so far but who knows what could happen someday? I figure that all I can do is put it in the back of my mind when riding and be prepared for the worst when I'm not riding.

Also, about the other thing... it bugs the shit outta me when people offer things like that and don't follow through. Couple years ago when I picked up my ZX6R, supposedly in good condition and straight, I later found out the triples were pretty badly tweaked along with the frame and the forks. I was being an idiot and didn't notice it myself when I test-rode the bike or looked over it, but it was noticeable enough that a CR didn't let me pass tech with it (btw thanks for catching that for me and not letting me ride it on the track in that condition!)

I bought a replacement set of forks and triples and had the frame straightened and talked to the guy about it, and asked him if he would cover 1/2 the cost of just the labor (not even the parts), to which he agreed and asked for a copy of the receipt. After I sent it to him, I never heard back anything despite several more calls and emails.

If he had just told me to screw myself and that I bought the bike as-is, I wouldn't have even been that upset because it was clearly my problem for not looking it over closely enough when I bought it. But to offer to help pay and then not do it.... why even bother offering in the first place?

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