Sunset Pictures - Chicagoland Sportbikes
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post #1 of 10 (permalink) Old 07-02-2007, 01:06 PM Thread Starter
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Sunset Pictures

I know theyre very tricky to get right but is there any way to get something close to this with a point and shoot? I have this camera
http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/spec...ony_dscw80.asp

If so, point me in the right direction for settings
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File Type: jpg sunset.jpg (53.0 KB, 39 views)

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post #2 of 10 (permalink) Old 07-02-2007, 01:13 PM
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I think it's a cool picture. But you titled the thread "sunset pictures" which is plural. I see only one picture.

Never a bad time to climb... unless the weather is really horrible, and then you climb inside!

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post #3 of 10 (permalink) Old 07-02-2007, 01:14 PM Thread Starter
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...because I'D like to take multiple pics...I wasnt posting multiple pics

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post #4 of 10 (permalink) Old 07-02-2007, 01:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2weelpilot View Post
...because I'D like to take multiple pics...I wasnt posting multiple pics
Ohhhhhh..... Ok. I was confused.

It's still a nice pic.

Never a bad time to climb... unless the weather is really horrible, and then you climb inside!

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post #5 of 10 (permalink) Old 07-02-2007, 01:21 PM
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Sure, you can do that, and even better.

First off, figure out how to set manual settings, or figure out how your particular camera meters (measures the light) the scene.

If you have manual settings, take a shot, see what it looks like on the screen, and adjust the shutter time up or down till you get the light how you want it to look.

If you have no manual settings, then you have to point the camera at different locations in the scene to "trick" it into adjusting the shutter speed until you get what you want.

For example:

Point at the sky, the meter will see lots of bright stuff, and shorten the shutter time to compensate.

Point at the grass, the meter sees something slightly darker then neutral and will adjust the shutter time longer then pointing at the sky.

Point at the darkest shadow in your scene and that will force the camera to use the longest shutter time available to compensate for what it thinks is a dark scene.

Lastly, one tip to let the camera do it's job would be to have something partially obstructing the big glowing ball in the sky. That way you get a more even exposure that the camera attempts to get both sky and land exposed properly. This often gives a nice halo around the sun, and allows the nice orange/purple colors to come out in the sunset without the sun overdriving the digital sensor and burning things out.

I hope that helps out some. Sorry I don't have any examples handy...but my work keeps me busy from 6AM to 6PM Mon-Fri and I've not seen many sunsets lately.

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post #6 of 10 (permalink) Old 07-02-2007, 01:26 PM
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So that's your shot?

The camera seems alright. Adjustable ISO? The one bad thing is the RGB color, and no Raw formatting, but Jpeg works just fine if you don't have any software to adjust basic settings.

You need to get one that can be adjusted manually, on everything. I know they are out there... just haven't looked into them, though I do need a P&S to keep in my pocket, lugging gear gets old.

On to the sunset settings. You want a small f/stop ie f/11 - f/22. Might need to bump your ISO sensitivity depending on your shutter speed. Having an f/ stop that is too big can cause flare, sun spots, and a poor shot. Getting a small aperture can be difficult depending on your other settings, so you want to use aperture priority. General rule is hand held anything shorter than 1/30 of a second. You can get it slower, though camera shake is the number one reason a shot is missed.

I would shoot that one ISO 400 f/16 and shutter accordingly. The f/stop is the important thing. You don't want it wide open ie at f/2.8, but you don't want it so small ie f/22 that you miss out on the clarity you get from the right f/ stop...

Understanding Exposure is a great book to have around. I have been shooting since high school on an off, but still keep this basic book lying around for reference. Here's a link Understanding Exposure by Bryan Peterson

ETA: If my mumbo-jumbo camera talk confused you, they offer classes if you're seriously interested at local community colleges... or you can start reading books. I gain more from books than I do from class, in class I'm usually helping the teacher teach other students.

ETA2: Dpreview is a decent sight, though a lot of people talking... photo.net seems to be a little more moderated and they make sure there isn't any false information given.

Last edited by Mort82; 07-02-2007 at 01:30 PM.
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post #7 of 10 (permalink) Old 07-02-2007, 02:45 PM Thread Starter
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its not my picture but one Id like to know how to duplicate as much as I can with my camera.

I have adjustable ISO but when you start putting numbers and letters together I get a little lost

I'll have to see what I can do

Mike

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post #8 of 10 (permalink) Old 07-02-2007, 02:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2weelpilot View Post
its not my picture but one Id like to know how to duplicate as much as I can with my camera.

I have adjustable ISO but when you start putting numbers and letters together I get a little lost

I'll have to see what I can do
Get a book on the basics of exposure to help you better understand it all.

Just remember the "triangle of photography" as I like to call it, Shutter, Aperture, and ISO

Shutter is how long the shutter stays open for. 1/30 is pretty slow. 1/250 is fast enough to stop Most actions, while some cameras go all the way up to something like 1/2500, but I rarely go over 1/500 of a second.

Aperture is how big the shutter opening is at the time of shutter release. f/1.2 (almost unheard of, only a couple lenses can do this) is wide open for low lighting. f/22 is for a bright sunny day, some cameras go down to f/44 or something crazy.

ISO is the sensitivity. The smaller the number, the darker the picture. The larger the number the brighter. Though this can be confusing and settings of ISO 100, 200, 400, 800 are most common while 1600 and higher is for extremely low lit scenarios. ISO 100 is perfect for a sunny day.

Sorry if I funcused ya.
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post #9 of 10 (permalink) Old 07-02-2007, 02:59 PM Thread Starter
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when I push and hold I see 40 f2.8

my ISO goes from 100-3200

This shutter speed you speak of...I need to find that

Mike

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post #10 of 10 (permalink) Old 07-02-2007, 03:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2weelpilot View Post
when I push and hold I see 40 f2.8
I'd say that's 1/40 of a second, (ETA: your shutter speed). That is pretty slow, though could be corrected if you have image stabilization. The f/2.8 is how open the lens is, that is the widest your lens can go.

Try this. See if you can zoom in on an object that has a deep background. Focus the subject so that you can see a lot of the background. Try to get the f-stop up to f/2.8. You will notice a "soft background" the background will look blurred.

Now don't move yet, keep the camera where it is and try to set the f-stop down to a higher f-stop number, which actually closes the aperture down, ie to f/16 or f/22...

Compare the two photos and you'll see the first has a soft background, while the second one might be in focus all the way around.

There's tons of info, and like I said, Photo.net has a few free explanations that are very informative. Sorry if I ramble or sound like a know it all, I know some of ya's thinks I'm cocky, but this is one thing I love...

Here's a link to what I just explained http://photo.net/learn/making-photographs/exposure
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