Why higher ISO on night stills? - Chicagoland Sportbikes
Chicagoland Sportbikes
 
Photographers Corner This forum is specifically for talk about camera's and photography. question about a camera or how to get that perfect shot post it here.

 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 13 (permalink) Old 01-31-2008, 02:24 PM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 6,882
           
Why higher ISO on night stills?

Over some time I notice night stills on dpreview from folks of buildings, bridges, or other things that don't really go bump in the night. Why do some bump the ISO up when the shutter time can simply be made longer? If you have a still object then why bother with ISO, what does it change? Because I thought the sole reason for bumping up the ISO was because the shutter speeds were too slow for objects that might have motion. Am I just totally missing something or what? Here's one of the threads where I see a 320ISO. I checked with Tony, he confirms I'm not off my rocker. How about some of the more seasoned vets here?

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/re...hread=26562567
BIGGY is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 13 (permalink) Old 01-31-2008, 02:28 PM
-= OuterSpace =-
 
OldSkoolMC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Homer Glen, MaDaFaKa!
Posts: 3,513
Location: Homer Glen, MaDaFaKa!
Sportbike: Yamaha YZ450
Years Riding: too many to keep track
How you found us: Shizzle
           
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGGY View Post
Over some time I notice night stills on dpreview from folks of buildings, bridges, or other things that don't really go bump in the night. Why do some bump the ISO up when the shutter time can simply be made longer? If you have a still object then why bother with ISO, what does it change? Because I thought the sole reason for bumping up the ISO was because the shutter speeds were too slow for objects that might have motion. Am I just totally missing something or what? Here's one of the threads where I see a 320ISO. I checked with Tony, he confirms I'm not off my rocker. How about some of the more seasoned vets here?

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/re...hread=26562567
Higher ISO = lower light use.

04 Yamaha YZ450F - Off-Road it, mang
06 Kawasaki BruteForce 750i
09 Yamaha Raptor 700r

- Mike - OldSkool - MC -
OldSkoolMC is offline  
post #3 of 13 (permalink) Old 01-31-2008, 02:34 PM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 6,882
           
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldSkoolMC View Post
Higher ISO = lower light use.
No, I know that part. But it's a still shot, there's no need to bump it. You can simply leave the shutter open longer. So why bump it on a still shot. If this was a party with people or if I was at the US Bowling Championships then a higher ISO of course makes sense, but why here?
BIGGY is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 13 (permalink) Old 01-31-2008, 02:38 PM
Serious inquiries only
 
Mort82's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Never-Neverland
Posts: 13,775
Location: Never-Neverland
Sportbike: Specialized Allez Comp; Gkotlin's SV650
Years Riding: Always learning
How you found us: Google
           
Send a message via AIM to Mort82
I think in this particular scenario, the photographer preferred it at the 320ISO, which she stated in the thread. I'm guessing it produced some artifact that the lower ISO did not, **edit: artifact that the photog wanted in the photo.**

I agree with you Biggy, just wait the extra 10 seconds or adjust the aperture and lower the ISO.

Last edited by Mort82; 01-31-2008 at 02:44 PM.
Mort82 is offline  
post #5 of 13 (permalink) Old 01-31-2008, 02:41 PM
Administrator
 
HDTony's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Plainfield IL
Posts: 45,956
Location: Plainfield IL
Sportbike: A couple of pasta rockets
Years Riding: Since 1989
How you found us: In the beginning there was CLSB and Tony saw that it was good.
           
Send a message via AIM to HDTony
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mort82 View Post

I agree with you Biggy, just wait the extra 10 seconds or adjust the aperture and lower the ISO.
+1




HDTony.... Damn glad to meet you!

Government's view of the economy could be summed up in a few short phrases: If it moves, tax it. If it keeps moving, regulate it. And if it stops moving, subsidize it.

- Ronald Reagan

AirTek Heating & Air inc.
HDTony is offline  
post #6 of 13 (permalink) Old 01-31-2008, 02:42 PM
-= OuterSpace =-
 
OldSkoolMC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Homer Glen, MaDaFaKa!
Posts: 3,513
Location: Homer Glen, MaDaFaKa!
Sportbike: Yamaha YZ450
Years Riding: too many to keep track
How you found us: Shizzle
           
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGGY View Post
No, I know that part. But it's a still shot, there's no need to bump it. You can simply leave the shutter open longer. So why bump it on a still shot. If this was a party with people or if I was at the US Bowling Championships then a higher ISO of course makes sense, but why here?
Read this dude: http://www.photoxels.com/tutorial_iso.html

ISO Speed & Exposure

ISO speed affects the shutter speed / aperture combinations you can use to obtain correct exposure.

Suppose your digital camera's light meter warns you there is not enough light to correctly expose a scene. You could use the on-board flash, but let's suppose again it's not allowed (like in a concert or indoors recital).

You would then need to use a higher ISO. Set on "ISO Auto" mode, your digital camera will automatically select a higher ISO. Otherwise, you can manually select the next higher ISO and see if the increased sensitivity allows you to obtain a correctly exposed picture. If it does, you can now take a correctly exposed picture.

Similarly, if you find the camera is using a shutter speed that is too slow (1/60 sec. and slower) to handhold the camera steady and shake-free (thus resulting in blurred pictures), and you cannot open up the aperture anymore, and you do not have a tripod or other means to hold the camera steady, and you want to capture the action, etc. etc. -- then you might select the next higher ISO which will then allow you to select a faster shutter speed.

04 Yamaha YZ450F - Off-Road it, mang
06 Kawasaki BruteForce 750i
09 Yamaha Raptor 700r

- Mike - OldSkool - MC -
OldSkoolMC is offline  
post #7 of 13 (permalink) Old 01-31-2008, 02:52 PM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 6,882
           
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldSkoolMC View Post
Read this dude: http://www.photoxels.com/tutorial_iso.html

ISO Speed & Exposure

ISO speed affects the shutter speed / aperture combinations you can use to obtain correct exposure.

Suppose your digital camera's light meter warns you there is not enough light to correctly expose a scene. You could use the on-board flash, but let's suppose again it's not allowed (like in a concert or indoors recital).

You would then need to use a higher ISO. Set on "ISO Auto" mode, your digital camera will automatically select a higher ISO. Otherwise, you can manually select the next higher ISO and see if the increased sensitivity allows you to obtain a correctly exposed picture. If it does, you can now take a correctly exposed picture.

Similarly, if you find the camera is using a shutter speed that is too slow (1/60 sec. and slower) to handhold the camera steady and shake-free (thus resulting in blurred pictures), and you cannot open up the aperture anymore, and you do not have a tripod or other means to hold the camera steady, and you want to capture the action, etc. etc. -- then you might select the next higher ISO which will then allow you to select a faster shutter speed.
No, I think we're on a different page. The picture in my example is a tripod shot. I'm referring to any type of night still shot with a longer exposure like 5 seconds or slower. The shot in the example is 20 seconds. I've been doing photography for a number of years and I get that at a place like a rock concert you need to bump the ISO of course. Not so much because flash isn't allowed but because any flash would pretty much be totally ineffective unless you're in the front row perhaps. But here in this example the photographer could have let the shutter open another 5 or however many seconds. Why go from ISO 100 to 320 in this specific type of shot is what I'm trying to figure out. Not why to use it in normal indoor dark photography, but still dark or night shots.
BIGGY is offline  
post #8 of 13 (permalink) Old 01-31-2008, 03:00 PM
-= OuterSpace =-
 
OldSkoolMC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Homer Glen, MaDaFaKa!
Posts: 3,513
Location: Homer Glen, MaDaFaKa!
Sportbike: Yamaha YZ450
Years Riding: too many to keep track
How you found us: Shizzle
           
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGGY View Post
No, I think we're on a different page. The picture in my example is a tripod shot. I'm referring to any type of night still shot with a longer exposure like 5 seconds or slower. The shot in the example is 20 seconds. I've been doing photography for a number of years and I get that at a place like a rock concert you need to bump the ISO of course. Not so much because flash isn't allowed but because any flash would pretty much be totally ineffective unless you're in the front row perhaps. But here in this example the photographer could have let the shutter open another 5 or however many seconds. Why go from ISO 100 to 320 in this specific type of shot is what I'm trying to figure out. Not why to use it in normal indoor dark photography, but still dark or night shots.
I see your point.

Answer: Simple... guy didn't feel like waiting around for a longer shutter/exposure.

04 Yamaha YZ450F - Off-Road it, mang
06 Kawasaki BruteForce 750i
09 Yamaha Raptor 700r

- Mike - OldSkool - MC -
OldSkoolMC is offline  
post #9 of 13 (permalink) Old 01-31-2008, 03:05 PM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 6,882
           
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldSkoolMC View Post
I see your point.

Answer: Simple... guy didn't feel like waiting around for a longer shutter/exposure.
(sigh) Now I gotta hit you don't I...
BIGGY is offline  
post #10 of 13 (permalink) Old 01-31-2008, 03:10 PM
-= OuterSpace =-
 
OldSkoolMC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Homer Glen, MaDaFaKa!
Posts: 3,513
Location: Homer Glen, MaDaFaKa!
Sportbike: Yamaha YZ450
Years Riding: too many to keep track
How you found us: Shizzle
           
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGGY View Post
(sigh) Now I gotta hit you don't I...


Yeah, but it's probably the truth.

If I was shooting off a pod at night I'd be at 100 iso with a long exposure too. There will be a lot less noise in the pic but I guess if you have a kick ass camera, a little higher ISO will save you some shooting time, and not have much noise in the shot.

04 Yamaha YZ450F - Off-Road it, mang
06 Kawasaki BruteForce 750i
09 Yamaha Raptor 700r

- Mike - OldSkool - MC -
OldSkoolMC is offline  
post #11 of 13 (permalink) Old 01-31-2008, 03:18 PM
habitual line stepper
 
Jack's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 3,235
Location: Wisconsin
Sportbike: F4,Brutale,Warrior,DRZ
Years Riding: X
How you found us: .
           
Send a message via AIM to Jack
FWIW when using a digital camera and a very long exposure, noise (and a lot of it) can creep in. So the length of the exposure can be a factor.
Jack is offline  
post #12 of 13 (permalink) Old 01-31-2008, 03:35 PM
Registered User
 
VTEC_EATER's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Waukegan, Illinois
Posts: 404
Location: Waukegan, Illinois
Sportbike: 2004 GSXR750 (street/track), 2003 ZX6R 636 (track)
Years Riding: I think Im on my 3rd now
How you found us: From other web forums (SBN, NESBA)
           
Film speed/ISO/whatever, can also be used to balance light as well. For example a shot with flash can benefit from upping the ISO to balance the natural light (background) and the flash (foreground).

Long exposures can do funny things to lights as well. They can make point light sources turn into bright globes without definition. They can wash out areas where a light may be shining and underexpose areas where very little light may be. I don't know the exact conditions, but maybe a slightly higher ISO was chosen to help pull in some of that pink color in the night sky, but not keep the shutter open too long as to blow out the tower in the background.

Just a thought.

Tom DeCoste aka "Tommy Tarmac"
Nesba #611 Advanced
VTEC_EATER is offline  
post #13 of 13 (permalink) Old 01-31-2008, 03:38 PM
The Benchwarmer
 
Village Idiot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Chicago
Posts: 14,580
Location: Chicago
Sportbike: Ninja
Years Riding: Long
How you found us: Dong
           
how pressed for time is someone that setup a tripod that they cant wait another 10-20seconds?

especially when it comes to photography. isnt this kind of a waiting game to begin with to get the perfect shot?

Men will never be free until the last king is strangled with the entrails of the last priest - Denis Diderot
Village Idiot is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Chicagoland Sportbikes forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome