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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I think its a Chicago only thing. And I really have no idea what it means. Looks like they are sourcing from a Non-coal provider at a lower rate, but still delivered by ComEd. You have the option to Opt-out, which in the information they provide seems stupid, but I'm concerned there is more to it than that.
 

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its happening in a bunch of suburbs around here too, couldn't find any details beside what you said about it... seems like alternate sourcing at a more variable and potentially lower rate than com-ed.

i was afraid it was gonna be a aggregate daily rate program, a guy in my world of tanks clan lives out in colorado and had that happen to him and between 4-8pm his electricity rate is quadrupled
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
its happening in a bunch of suburbs around here too, couldn't find any details beside what you said about it... seems like alternate sourcing at a more variable and potentially lower rate than com-ed.

i was afraid it was gonna be a aggregate daily rate program, a guy in my world of tanks clan lives out in colorado and had that happen to him and between 4-8pm his electricity rate is quadrupled
My though was that during peak times they were going to regulate usage, ie, cut the electricity so you cant run the ac when its 100 degrees outside. I've heard of communities going to something like that. It seems like this is almost a co-op version of electricity sharing, but without much info to go on, I cant be sure. If its just alternate enegry sourcing at a lower rate, then why not, but I still question the motive behind it
 

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It's a group buy kind of thing.

The City buys electricity from someone else than Com Ed for it's residents, at a contract price that is cheaper than Com Ed's rates.

If you don't want to be in on the group buy, you can opt out. I'm getting a better rate from Champion Energy.
 

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its happening in a bunch of suburbs around here too, couldn't find any details beside what you said about it... seems like alternate sourcing at a more variable and potentially lower rate than com-ed.

i was afraid it was gonna be a aggregate daily rate program, a guy in my world of tanks clan lives out in colorado and had that happen to him and between 4-8pm his electricity rate is quadrupled
Can't do that without time-of-day metering, and Com Ed is delaying rolling out those meters in its Illinois territory. New date for completion was moved from 2012 to 2015 at a recent ICC meeting.
 

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It's going to be a fixed rate of 5.424¢/kWh, according to the letter I got (vs. 8.819¢/kWh on the ComEd rate). It's not an hourly rate.

The trick is, while Integrys has promised to match the ComEd rate, they're only going to do that each time the contract with the City is up for renewal. The pundits are suggesting that ComEd's default rate will come down in June or so, so the savings aren't likely to be quite as good after that.

Now, if you want an hourly rate, that's available too. ComEd's is at https://rrtp.comed.com/, and I'd imagine there are others (though I can't find them at present).
 

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I switched last April to an alternate supplier. My current contract rate is $0.052001 /KWH ( 5.2001 cents /KWH) through the end of October. I don't see either ComEd's or the City's rate beating that in the contract time frame.

You still pay ComEd's serivce, metering and delivery charges and the city franchise fee recovery (we pay ComEd for the money they gave the city to have it's electric franchise.) + state and city tax on top of that per KWH rate. In my case, ComEd's service, metering, delivery and franchise charges are usually about equal to or higher than my charges for KWH usage.

I looked into Real Time Pricing. You get killed with the estimated (not based on your actual previous usage) demand charge the first year, and compared to my fixed rate, it's not a better deal. I haven't seen any hourly price lower than 3.0¢ /KWH in the winter, and at peak times in summer, (last summer) it went above 16¢ /KWH on hot days when my usage is higher due to air conditioning. And the Demand Charge can effectively double that rate.

Additionally, consumers on ComEd's RRTP residential rate can't access actual usage on an hourly basis as far as I can tell from their literature. you can only see it on line (hourly price) after it's already in effect, and your actual usage a day or two later, when it's too late to adjust usage. Without the ability to see real-time usage and pricing, including estimated next 15 minute/next hour pricing, I don't see the point.

It also appears that ComEd isn't supporting OpenADR for residential customers, which would allow residential consumers to use devices that respond in real-time to pricing changes and limit electric usage. At least I can't find any mention of it in ComEd's literature.

All in all, as far as I can tell, ComEd's RRTP is a non-starter in its current implementation.
 

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The statement of origin for energy that I got from Champion says that 100% of their power comes from unknown sources.

I guess it's magical power. :D



They are a power broker, and I would assume it comes from whatever is cheapest at that moment.

They do offer a "green energy" contract that is a bit more costly that is some sort of green power.
 
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