Chicagoland Sportbike Forums banner
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone have any advice on what the best steering damper for the buck is? I'll fork over some extra $ for a quality kit, but I'm not on unlimited funds. It's for a '98 ZX6R.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,495 Posts
Scotts probably is the best overall.

I have to ask also, what are you doing that makes you think you need one on that bike.

It's kind of like ABS on a car, it can help but it doesn't solve all your problems. Every racer that high sides on TV had a steering dampener. a lot of headshakes are from riding too stiff, riding unsmooth and fighting the bars.

I personally decided to get a $600 rear shock instead of spending $400 on a Scotts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
79 Posts
how is the ohlin style damper i was deciding between the two for my r6?
 

·
habitual line stepper
Joined
·
3,235 Posts
lossofsanity said:
how is the ohlin style damper i was deciding between the two for my r6?
The Ohlins is good, maybe better, but lacks adjustability, and if mounted inside the fairing, lacks ease of adjustability and more difficult to mount. And the Ohlins is more expensive.
 

·
CLSB SuperHero
Joined
·
1,808 Posts
I have the Scotts on my bike and love it. Its fully adjustable on the fly. The Ohlins is also a quality damper, but not as easy to adjust while riding, and is a little more expensive. I'm with everyone else as to why you need it on your bike. The R1 desperately needs a damper, hence this is why it was my first mod.

Good luck with whichever one you decide to get.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Usually when I pick up the front tire, my handle bars start to go back and forth such that I have to let off for fear of eating it. I first thought that this would go away as I get more used to popping wheelies, but the other day when I let go of the handle bars while slowing down (on a very familar and smooth stretch of road and on 2 wheels, just for clarification) to relax my hands for a sec, the handle bars started vibrating quite a bit. I'm sure it wasn't something in the road that caused it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,186 Posts
dhill said:
Usually when I pick up the front tire, my handle bars start to go back and forth such that I have to let off for fear of eating it. I first thought that this would go away as I get more used to popping wheelies, but the other day when I let go of the handle bars while slowing down (on a very familar and smooth stretch of road and on 2 wheels, just for clarification) to relax my hands for a sec, the handle bars started vibrating quite a bit. I'm sure it wasn't something in the road that caused it.
that sounds like another problem. Not sure the dampner is going to solve that. Maybe your wheel is out of balance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
forgot to mention, front tire's a bit bald, I'm getting that replace this week. I'll let you know after that. I'm wondering though, how would a tire balance problem affect the wobbling when my front tire is off the ground?
 

·
YO MAMA
Joined
·
60,258 Posts
wait a minute?...since we are talking about a wheelie head shake?

is it when you UP off the ground its jiggling back and forth?
or when you touch it back down it starts?

also too having a bald tire is 1/2 your problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,186 Posts
dhill said:
forgot to mention, front tire's a bit bald, I'm getting that replace this week. I'll let you know after that. I'm wondering though, how would a tire balance problem affect the wobbling when my front tire is off the ground?
It still spins when your off the groud. It's the old wheel on the stick theory. You can even steer your bike doing a wheelie by turning it the opposite way that you want the go. The centrifical force will pull the bike over. Now throw something off-balance you get wobble. Like if you put a baseball in the spokes of the wheel on the stick and spun it. It would wobble.;)
 

·
habitual line stepper
Joined
·
3,235 Posts
A slow speed wobble, felt at say 45mph decelerating is common. It could be a number of things, worn rear tire, out of alignment rear axle, loose or bad head bearings, but I usually find that the culprit is a worn or cupped front tire.

If you're saying that your tire wants to wobble when you're doing a wheelie, that isn't right. Since you're replacing the front wheel, that's an easy way to see if that's the problem. Also pay close attention to how easily the front wheel comes off and is replaced. You might have a bent front axle, or maybe your shock tubes are misaligned.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,885 Posts
just put my Scotts at lunch on Sunday at Gingerman. I was feeling some significant head shake powering out of the turns while still at a decent lean angle. Nothing huge, but then I threw on the Scotts and it was gone completely.

Plus it is easily switchable to another bike. I bought a kit for the other bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Odysseys: It's mostly when I lift up to do a wheelie that it jiggles, but it happened once while on the ground (not associated with a wheelie). When I set back down from a wheelie, the jiggling stops.
Crazy: Yea, makes sense.
Jack: I'm betting on the bald tire after thinking more about it. I'll replace it and get back on here if there's still a problem.
All: Thanks for the advice.
 

·
YO MAMA
Joined
·
60,258 Posts
Yeah dude your getting head shake...here this is what causes it.

when ever the front wheel gets some pressure relieved from it..(excelerating REALLY hard) the front tires contact patch is reduced....while this happens...little waves, patch, ripples, etc, in the road will make the front tire loose its stability and its corrective stability's in its rake and trail. when this happens...it feeling like it almost wants to go into a tank slapper..(which could happen..its only a matter of degrees)

What can ya do to reduce this?
1. Always have good tires
2. Possible to much front rebound
3. possible to much rear SAG and OR compression dialed in
4. Your suspension needs some dialing

WHAT do I think it is from what your saying?
Tighten the front rebound 2 clicks each
and get a new tire...that should be really close if not get rid of that. almost for sure!

i get them a lot on my 9r when RAMMING threw 1st or but mostly 2nd gear...and i am NOT pulling the wheel up high..but in 2nd when i snap that throttle and ride it out...of course the front is getting light and sometimes if the road isn't perfect..BAMM it starts to wiggle back and forth...most times i just ride it out while i am still on the gas...sometime if you just cut the throttle it will help and other times..it calls for getting on the gas harder...i got a few ways to explain it..but it will take for ever to put it into simple words.
 

·
(no comment)
Joined
·
353 Posts
I've used a MToby, a Hyperpro and an Öhlins damper on my R1, and I have to say I like the Öhlins best.

The MToby was the least expensive and worked just fine, but it began to leak in less than a year. It could have been a fluke, I wouldn't count it out as a good damper for the money. It mounted out of the way under the guages.

The Hyperpro never really worked for me. First, the bracket was a bitch to get on and off anytime I needed to get under the tank. Secondly, it never was able to keep the front from shaking. I sold it.

The Öhlins I have mounts under the guages across the headstock. It works great and is always out of the way when I need to work on the bike. It may not have 2 dozen different adjustments like the Scotts, but I don't feel I need them. I set a few clicks into it when I first bought it and never had to adjust it since. I've never felt the need to adjust it on the fly. It takes care of any headshake and you don't feel it on the bars at low speeds. It works like it's supposed to. Öhlins also makes an across the tank mount if you like that option.

Scotts seems to be a pretty popular damper. They mount right on the stem nut on the triple tree. I believe Öhlins actually designed them and Scotts produces them. They were primarilly a MX bike design that has crossed over. I've seen them being used on race bikes at the pro level so they must work.

Matris also makes a pretty flashy damper that mounts across the top of the tank and has the speed sensitivity like a hyperpro. It's got some pretty good reviews.

A lot of people have a lot of different favorites, and most, like me, will defend their choice as a good one. I haven't heard too many people complain about a damper they chose. They all work, for the most part, some just have more bells and whistles than others.

I think the bottom line is to get the one that:
<li> You can afford</li>
<li> You like the look of</li>
<li> Mounts in a place that won't be in your way</li>

The guys are right that you may have a tire problem, and that a correctly tuned suspension can rectify a lot of your problem, but I look at a damper like insurance or a seat belt. You may not be in a situation where you'd need one for a long time, but when you need it, it can save your ass.

You can also try, as Oddy said, power or throttle through it. Also, don't tense your arms up, keep relaxed as your arms become part of the bike when you hold on to tight and that just compounds the problem.

Good Luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
dhill said:
Does anyone have any advice on what the best steering damper for the buck is? I'll fork over some extra $ for a quality kit, but I'm not on unlimited funds. It's for a '98 ZX6R.


Matris dampers at www.twobros.com. The very finest, imho. I would have bought this if I were buying 1 damper, not 1 damper for 3 different bikes. I bought the Scotts so it would be interchangeable between my sv, zrx and falco...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Actually the Scotts damper is made in sweeden by ohlins,it is sold everywhere else in the world as an ohlins. The only adjustment you should make on the Scotts is the knob with the pointer , if your not careful turning the other adjustments can screw the damper up . The normal ohlins damper is adjustable and very very good.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top