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What do you guys think, would I gain more by doing a track school for like $1000 and giving up 4 or 5 track days or just continuing to learn on my own (wiht comments from fellow riders). I've come pretty far in the last year mostly on my own, but I wonder if I'm getting close to hitting a wall in my learning curve.

I know how I can go faster, but I can't seem to put it all together and just do it.

SO will it simply come with more track time, or should I spend that cash (and give up some track time) and take one of those schools.


Although maybe I should take the MSF class first. I'm a unsafe rider.:p :laughing
 

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GO RACING! nothing will make you go faster than competition!:evil Thats my plan for next season, seems to have worked well for Kim/DanO/OmniGLH/Lourdes13...

I'm in the same boat. I've never done a real track "school". I've heard nothing but good things about Pridmore and Schwanz's schools, and I'd love to attend in the future...thinking of maybe Schwanz at Road Atlanta!!!:evil How cool would it be to get instruction from a former World GP champ??? I've heard that they also do alot of on-bike filming and review of technique which would be awesome.
 

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Evil Moderatrix,
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Have your lap times stopped decreasing? Have you really hit a plateau, or are you just progressing more slowly? The track record at Blackhawk is 1:11... progress will come in smaller increments as you approach the limit.

Go racing! There's nothing like the adrenaline rush borne of competition to push you beyond your "comfort zone".

I too am considering some more intensive instruction next season and would welcome feedback from the more experienced riders/racers in our group. I know we talked about race schools in a thread much earlier in the year... Who went where and got what this season? Let's hear about it!
 

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Give 'em hell guys!!
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Like they said, GO RACING !!! Nothing is better than direct competition to improve your skills. You will learn more riding with faster riders than you would doing trackdays. And when you feel you've hit your wall in your learning curve move up to Expert and riding with the Experts will make you faster also.

There is nothing more rewarding than passing for position in a race.
:cheers
 

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Give 'em hell guys!!
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KBOlsen said:
I too am considering some more intensive instruction next season and would welcome feedback from the more experienced riders/racers in our group.
There is nothing wrong with going to a race school to improve yourself. That being said, IMHO you would learn more by racing more and spending time during the week to make sure your bike is the best it can be. The money you save from not going to the racing school could fund a couple of race weekends.
 

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I agree with mark and steve, that is my plan for next year!!
 

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Mike- Don't blow all that cash for a track school. I would suggest racing also, but this means you have to buy race glass. So there goes half of your $1000 (at least). Then you're probably going to want to run 208GPs or something comparable. You can get a set of take offs for around $100. Then, you should have enough money to afford a race weekend. I did forget that you have to spend the $$ for race school and your racing license. So, all this adds up. I also don't know if you are willing to lose your bike to the track w/o one for the street. As you saw w/ Allen's bike, it can happen and that's something you will have to take into consideration.

You might benefit from saving the $1000 with the idea of buying an F2 or F3. Hell, even an SV. Then you can keep your F4i (i stands for interstate) w/ 30,000miles on it for street riding.

Lastly, you can just learn by trial and error. By going to the "private" track days w/ the George's, Bob Miller, or whoever. That's where I would say I've learn the most, with exception to Andy Weib. helping me w/ foot positions. It is almost like a race except people are a little more cautious of each other and you really learn throttle control and picking/choosing different lines to get around people.

I guess if I were in your situation, I would save for the track only bike. My reasoning is that I wouldn't be able to take a complete loss on the F4i and w/ 30,000 miles who knows what could go out of whack. Not that it necessarily would, but for a track bike that is a shit load of miles regardless of the type of riding you'd be doing.

Let me know what you're going to do.


Doc
 

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OMG!! Talk about deja vu!! KB didn't we just have this discussion a few weeks ago at lunch. I even spoke to another member of our group about this today!! Here's my personal spin on it: For me personally I have never done a track day before. So, before I do, I feel that I would get the most benefit out of spending the extra money on quality schooling (i.e. Reg Pridmore, Keith Code, etc...) and learn the right way to ride on the track while improving my riding skills for the road instead of just heading out and doing a track day on my own and run the risk of picking up bad habits. Not saying that the control riders aren't good to learn from but it's my feeling that if I learn the basics in the classes the control riders at the track days afterward can help me "fine tune" my skills. With that being said, KB and I also talked about getting a group of members together to attend one of these schools and see if we can get some sort of group rate for next year. Maybe at Road America before the AMA races. I'll start a thread to see what kind of interest is out there in the open forum and go from there checking into the different schools around.
 

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Who's faster Lupi
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Going with the Gang here. More track time.
 

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Question for the more enlightened:

How does one go about getting a CCS license? I'd like to get involved with their program at some point to improve my riding and get some more track time. I just don't know where to begin.

More importantly, I've heard that the Amateur Sportbike 600 is a lousy place to start out as it's really crowded etc. I think I qualify for some other classes (by my bike, not abilitiy) so I'm curious about what to look for.

I probably should've started a new thread with all these questions...but you get the idea.

Sorry if this was :eek:t

Thanks.
 

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Underdog said:
More importantly, I've heard that the Amateur Sportbike 600 is a lousy place to start out as it's really crowded etc. I think I qualify for some other classes (by my bike, not abilitiy) so I'm curious about what to look for.
CCS classes devide mainly by bike size (engine displacement and configuration) and then by state of tune, some classes combine Expert and Amatuers while some are separated. 600cc liquid cooled inline 4's compete mainly in Middleweight Supersport and Middleweight Superbike. The main difference between Supersport and Superbike rules are that Superbikes can run unlimited engine mods within the class displacement limits and can also use slicks/alternate forks....ect

With an SV650 your main classes would be Lightweight Supersport, Lightweight Superbike, and GT lights (mini-endurance). While its true the Lightweight grid sizes aren't as large as the Middleweight classes they DO combine experts and amatuers in the same races (run a two wave start). So after a couple laps the fast experts WILL be dicing through the Amatuer pack.
 

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im fairly new to riding track so more track time then go for the licence right should i wait to get till i feel more comfortable on the bike or should i just go balls out and try for the licence? just wondering
 

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My goal is to get my license just so I can do the Friday practice day. I would like to try one race weekend, but I don't have the finances for a bunch of the weekends.

Mike- If you do end up getting your license, let me know. We both could do the class together.


Doc
 

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Evil Moderatrix,
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Do the Learning Curves school in the spring and get your license. There is no law that says you have to go out racing the very next day. I know people who hold racing licenses and just do the practice days - it pays for itself. Do a few track days... get a lap timer or have someone time your laps and see where you stand in relation to the race pace. If you can hold your line in heavy passing traffic without being rattled, you should be okay.
 

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Track Day vs. school

I choose the track days over the school most of the time because of cost (& I don't think I going to break into the race scene)

BUT

If you are going to spend money, you can hit some of the schools for about $400/day. The schools are better structured to teaching you more of what you need to know...they teach you WHY you should/shouldn't do someting (thurough explanations that help you remember)...they teach you alot of mental skills .. they spend a lot of time un-teaching you all of your bad habits you have been practicing at all of your track days.

I think it wouldn't hurt to at least try to squeeze in one school day in between every handfull of track days (this is what I'm trying to do)

___________

One of the schools preaches that you learn fastest if your only riding at 75-80% of your limit !! So, if you are still having trouble "trying to pull it all together," try turning your speed down a notch or two (for a few sessions). Sometimes you learn by "pushing" yourself faster, but a lot of the time you just end up doing a bunch of things wrong & you end up fighting with the bike. Go slower, relax, hit your lines, keep it smooth, practice doing a bunch of stuff Right. The speed will automatically come back before you know it.

Good Luck
 

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I think that's the plan for me (KB's plan that is). I'll be doing an LC class at BlackHawk this Spring, and hopefully getting my license (or at least figuring out what I need to work on to get it) and start attending some practice days to see what I'm getting myself into. I doubt I'll do much "racing" (or "following") next season, but the more tracktime and practice the better.

loss, you and I are in the same boat (only you couldn't seem to stay on the track :twofinger ). So if anyone wants to join us for the LC day-licensing...more power to ya'll.

(is it Springtime yet?)
 

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"following":rofl
(in my case, it's soooooo very apropos!)
 

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Here's a question: for the race school do you have to have a belly pan? Just wondering, because I don't know how soon I will get race glass. I know for CCS you do have to have the belly pan. Just wondering.


Doc
 

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Doc said:
Here's a question: for the race school do you have to have a belly pan? Just wondering, because I don't know how soon I will get race glass. I know for CCS you do have to have the belly pan. Just wondering.
Doc
No bellypan required for the LC school. I think even CCS will waive the bellypan rule one time if you decide to race the next day.

Tech inspection is done by the CCS tech guys and it was a complete joke, he looked at my bike for 1.5sec then put the tech sticker on it. OTOH they seemed VERY concerned about the font and size of the numbers on Loudes13's bike causing him to miss a practice session while he redid his numbers...:rolleyes :rolleyes

You could also "modify" your stock lowers to hold the required 3quart capacity (CCS rules). Some simple sheetmetal or fiberglass work could do the job.
 
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